Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Stranded on Canal Street, Robert Termier, 66, and Ruth Ann Lewis, 49, await rescue attempt by helicopter. They were later evacuated by boat.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Parts of New Orleans are under high floodwaters, particularly areas nearest to Lake Pontchartrain.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Residents of New Orleans wait to leave the city on buses bound for the Houston Astrodome. Many, like the woman lying down, were suffering from dehydration.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Four-month-old Alison Haynes rests in the box the family's military food rations came in, as sisters Lexus, left, and Ariel have a meal. The family is among those who took refuge at the Superdome.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Dillion Chancey, 7, rode out Hurricane Katrina in Biloxi with his mother and father. The family lost virtually everything it owned to the storm.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Kathy Haywood shields her 86-year-old mother, Rose McGrath, from the dust kicked up by helicopters making rescue missions in New Orleans. The mother and daughter were evacuated from a refugee shelter in the hurricane-devastated city.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Hundreds gather in hopes of a ride out of New Orleans. New emergencies continued to threaten thousands of refugees, and efforts were underway to evacuate the city.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A man is helped onto a bus at the Superdome after Hurricane Katrina. Many of the people staying at the Superdome were suffering from dehydration and other ailments

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A critically ill man is helped at the triage area of the Superdome, where many ill and elderly people are being treated. Observers say the hurricane has exposed the racial fault line between blacks and whites in America.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A shopping cart helps children stay above the filthy water as residents make their way to the Superdome for evacuation.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Milvirtha Hendricks, 85, can do nothing but wait for help at New Orleans' convention center. She was later evacuated, almost a week after the storm hit.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Sgt. Alex Martinez of the Texas Air National Guard uses a chair to shovel away debris at the Superdome as storm victims queue up to leave after days of misery.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Ceasar Martin, 20, lies in a helicopter with other evacuees as they prepare to take off from New Orleans Convention Center. The sick and elderly and their families were being evacuated first.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A boat with a rescue team looking for survivors moves along a street near Elysian Fields Avenue in New Orleans.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Florida National Guard members rescued Henery Johnson, 5 months, off an apartment rooftop in New Orleans on Friday. Louisiana officials are begging Washington to help shore up natural buffers so that the city can withstand future storms.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

An Army National Guardsman stationed at the New Orleans Convention Center. Troops did not encounter mob violence there that they'd expected.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

New Orleans Police Officers Mike Duzmar, left, and Patrick Hartman, whose home is unlivable, search for survivors. The two were part of a Marine-led team sweeping the area.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

U.S. Marines trudge through mud as they go door to door in search of survivors and bodies in New Orleans' 9th Ward. Louisiana officials said the city was now 50% flooded, with water levels receding rapidly. Nearly two-thirds of southeastern Louisiana's water treatment plants were up and running.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Rabbi Isaac Leider wades through floodwaters to remove a Torah scroll from Congregation Beth Israel in New Orleans.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

The Lafon Nursing Home of the Holy Family in New Orleans was the scene of 19 deaths. Many of the city's dead "were the poorer and older people," Coroner Frank Minyard said.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

A New York firefighter watches water flow over a levee and into the Gentilly neighborhood. Rains from Hurricane Rita have inundated canals and reflooded parts of the city that were devastated by Hurricane Katrina almost a month ago.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Lawrence "Butch" Heller, 49, rests after searching a relative's house in Chalmette, La., for belongings. The markings above the mailbox were made by searchers. Residents were allowed back into St. Bernard Parish, which saw major flooding from Hurricane Katrina. Some are determined to stay, while others will relocate.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

All that John MacFarlane has left of his Waveland, Miss., house is a photo. He now lives in the pop-up trailer. The federal government will be spending billions to rebuild the Gulf Coast.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Lela Wells of Vancleave, a town in rural Mississippi, watches President Bush on television. Wells, who says she is suffering from cancer, Alzheimer's and diabetes, lives in a community where help for those whose lives were affected by Hurricane Katrina is scarce.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

FEMA has installed dozens of prefabricated houses at a mobile home park in Pearl River, La., about 30 miles northeast of New Orleans. Similar sites will sprout across Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana, and Congress estimates that about 450,000 families will need long-term housing.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

More galleries on Framework

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A sobering look back five years after Hurricane Katrina

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A sobering look back five years after Hurricane Katrina

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A sobering look back five years after Hurricane Katrina

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A sobering look back five years after Hurricane Katrina

On Aug. 29, 2005,  at approximately 8 a.m., Hurricane Katrina came ashore on the Gulf Coast, wreaking havoc and causing widespread destruction from Florida to Texas. Ultimately, the storm would claim 1,836 lives.

Especially hard hit were Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, with New Orleans suffering the greatest damage and loss of lives. Initially, New Orleans escaped a direct hit from Katrina; but in the following days, as the storm surge rose and levees gave way, chaos and tragedy spread throughout the city.

This gallery of images by Times photographers shows the aftermath of the most costly disaster in United States history.

4 Comments

  1. August 27, 2010, 6:05 pm

    […] A sobering look back five years after Hurricane Katrina comes from the LA Times. […]

  2. August 27, 2010, 6:15 pm

    […] A sobering look back five years after Hurricane Katrina comes from the LA Times. […]

  3. August 28, 2010, 2:32 am

    […] Staten worden elk jaar door orkanen getroffen. Zondag 29 augustus herdenkt New Orleans de grootste. Katrina. Het is dan vijf jaar geleden dat de orkaan vele slachtoffers eiste en een groot deel van de stad […]

  4. August 28, 2010, 12:04 pm

    […] are plenty of signs that the city is bouncing back from the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, even in parts of the city devastated by the flood, such as the Lower 9th Ward. But in the […]

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