Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

A young boy flies a kite on top of a building in the Fort National neighborhood of the Haitian capital, one of the worst-hit districts in the city and an area where the government is cleaning up rubble and making way for new roads.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

"I want to live," Philomise Blanc, 67, says. After losing her house in the earthquake, she moved in with her daughter and grandson Quieten Vixamar, 2, pictured. They live in the hilltop neighborhood of Fort National. "I want to live in peace and be able to eat and take care of myself," she said.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

Residents of the Delmas 33 refugee camp say they don't plan to leave any time soon, miserable as the conditions are. They're worried about being sent somewhere worse.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

Sylvain Jean, 52, right, says he wants the government to release the materials needed to build temporary shelters like this one in his neighborhood. Widowed by the earthquake, he cares for his five children and waits for housing.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

Jean Johnny, 28, supervises a team building temporary shelters outside the capital.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

A warehouse used by the Adventist Development and Relief Agency sits largely empty because of paperwork problems that have kept homebuilding supplies stuck in customs.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

Residents of the Delmas 33 camp navigate a muddy pass after a night of rain.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

Lorciane Nicolas, 26, seated, and her sister Guilande, 20, standing next to her, say the water gets so high at times in this part of the Delmas 33 camp that it enters their makeshift house. But they've spent too much time and money making the camp their new home to want to leave, they say.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

The Bel Air neighborhood is littered with trash after the previous night's rain.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

Women rush to and from a water station as a storm approaches in the neighborhood of Fort National.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

Tuberculosis patient Michelet Francois is visible beyond the equally thin body of Jean Marc at General Hospital. They and other patients seek refuge from the heat of the TB ward tents, which can reach 100 degrees. Although the patients are served regular meals, the calories aren't sufficient for them to get stronger.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

Manise E. Derice, 25, says she has no plans to leave the Delmas 33 camp.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

Sunset in the Fort National neighborhood.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

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Land disputes slow efforts to help Haiti's homeless

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Land disputes slow efforts to help Haiti’s homeless

People displaced by the Jan. 12 earthquake in Haiti have taken refuge on vacant land, often to the displeasure of landowners. But in Haiti, it’s difficult to know who really owns a piece of property because of generations of corruption, dictatorship, coups and spoils-sytem governance. Multiple people may lay claim to the same parcel, and that has complicated efforts to relocate the more than 1 million people still in need of homes. To build anything, officials must know who owns the land being built on. Times staff writer Joe Mozingo and staff photographer Liz O. Baylen traveled to Haiti in July to report this story. Read the full story, “No plan in sight for Haiti’s homeless.

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