Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Abdul Rashid, center, with granddaughter Lina and son Farooq, had to sell his home in Kabul to pay the fare to get out of Taliban territory in an overloaded pickup.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A young soldier with the anti-Taliban Northern Alliance force attends a training meeting in the hills outside Jabal os Saraj, his weapon close at hand.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Anti-Taliban Northern Alliance fighters gather for a meeting on battle strategy on the Shomali plain north of Kabul, the Afghan capital.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Merza Khan, left, eats dinner with his anti-Taliban comrades at a front-line post north of Kabul. He lost a leg fighting the Soviets in 1989.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A volunteer fighter stands guard at a mosque where several hundred other fighters were staying in the small village of Erab, Pakistan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

Billows of smoke and dust rise after a B-52 Stratofortress dropped bombs on Taliban forces along the front lines north of Kabul.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

In Quetta, Pakistan, a boy walks by a life-size effigy of then-Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf that was torn apart during a rally against the U.S.-led assault on the Taliban in nearby Afghanistan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Northern Alliance forces return to their barracks after exercises north of Kabul.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Northern Alliance forces pray at sunset on the front line.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A boy keeps pace with a group of Northern Alliance tanks headed south toward Taliban strongholds.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A boy covers his face against the smell of bodies that lie on the sidewalk in Kabul after an American bomb hit a vehicle carrying Taliban fighters.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Residents of Kabul celebrate Northern Alliance troops' entrance into the city by showering them with money.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A Northern Alliance soldier waves a pistol in triumph as residents of Kabul line up to greet soldiers. The troops' arrival signaled the departure of Taliban forces from the Afghan capital.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Two boys look through the holes in the thick glass that used to protect a security guard station at the former Russian Embassy compound in Kabul.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A young Afghan swings with his friends in a village near Kabul during festivities marking the end of Ramadan, the Muslim holy month.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times

Marine Lt. Ronald Reed of Virginia waits inside his fighting position on the perimeter of the bombed-out airport in Kandahar.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Gunnery Sgt. Vincent Owsley holds an artillery shell as the Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit prepares to blow up weapons found near Kandahar airport.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Women waiting in line to receive food in Kabul remain as covered up as when the Islamic fundamentalist Taliban regime controlled the city.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times

Abdul Qudus, 55, at the once-thriving Jangalak industrial complex in Afghanistan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A girl in a refugee camp shields her face from photographers.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

These amputees are patients receiving prothesis and rehabilitation at the Red Cross clinic in Kabul.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Issa, 7, finds a syringe while sorting garbage at a recycle depot in Quetta, Pakistan. Any form of plastic is among the items the Afghan refugee can sell. Other valuable finds are animal bones, glass, metal, and paper.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Flaming debris bursts skyward after the demolition of 90 Russian rockets found in Afghanistan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

U.S. Staff Sgt. Dan pats down an Afghan man while Master Sgt. Frank stands guard at a nighttime checkpoint between Herat and Chaghcharan, Afghanistan. Dan and Frank are part of a 10-man team from the Army's 20th Special Forces group.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Two men have their dog lie quietly during other dogs' fights at a dirt lot on the edge of Kabul. The canine's neck is decorated with bells and colored balls. Some owners hope to win a jackpot bet, others take part for the pleasure of the blood sport.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

U.S. Marine Corps 1st Lt. Shaun Miller makes his way through an opium poppy field in the southern province of Helmand. His work includes assessing war damage to farmers' property and arranging compensation.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Hussein, left, gets help shooting heroin from fellow addict Anwar at an abandoned building in Kabul, Afghanistan. With them is Jaffer, who joined a rehab program a week later.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

In the concrete basin of a dry fountain in Kabul, Australian Sharna Nolan, left, holds the hand of a girl during one of the skateboarding sessions wildly popular with children in the Afghan capital.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Life for the women of Afghanistan has improved since 2001, but many problems still remain. Few women remain on the streets after dark.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Hunger and poverty remain a critical issue for many Afghan residents, some like this woman and her children who recently returned to Afghanistan from Pakistan where they were refugees.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Nayda, 23, asks for more children at a Kabul shrine where one day a week is set aside for women . Ancient customs persist, consigning women to roles as wives and mothers, attitudes abetted by poverty, illiteracy and insecurity.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

An Afghan national police member smokes a cigarette before the start of the May 22 operation in western Kandahar's District 8. U.S. commanders say the Taliban exercises more autonomy in the district than anywhere in the city.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Spec. Andrew Kimbell, 25, of the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division's 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, center, is welcomed back to Afghanistan after a 15-day R&R leave with a cloud of dust from a Chinook helicopter that had just dropped him off at Forward Operating Base Jalawar. Kimbell spent his leave in Spencer, Iowa where he grew up. Flanking him are PFC Ben Hoffmeister and Sgt. Benjamin Amato, who came to pick him up from the landing zone. The 82 Airborne Division is fanned out in Arghandab, a region in Kandahar plagued by Taliban resistance.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Pfc. Preston Young immediately alerts the command post of a blast that hit his patrol as they walked down a dirt road that connects farmland in a rural area. Two soldiers from the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division were thrown to the ground in the incident, but they were not seriously injured.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Staff Sgt. Christopher Nealis of the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division, yells for a soldier before heading out on patrol from their combat outpost in Kuhat, in Afghanistan's Kandahar province.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

More galleries on Framework

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War in Afghanistan: A look back from the beginning

Hollywood Park images 1938-1991

After 75 years of racing, Hollywood Park in Inglewood is closing on Dec. 22, 2013. This gallery consists of images from 1938-1991. In a May 10, 2013 article, columnist Eric...   View Post»

   

War in Afghanistan: A look back from the beginning

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“reFramed” is a feature showcasing fine art photography and vision-forward photojournalism. It is curated by Los Angeles Times staff photographer Barbara Davidson.   View Post»

   

War in Afghanistan: A look back from the beginning

Pictures in the News | Sept. 4, 2012

In Tuesday's Pictures in the News: Protesters brave water cannons as they break through barricades toward Indian police in New Delhi. Supporters of Pakistani religious party...   View Post»

   

Guilty verdict in 'Irvine 11' case

Guilty verdict in 'Irvine 11' case

Ten Muslim students found guilty of conspiring to disrupt -– and then disrupting –- a speech at UC Irvine by Israel's ambassador were sentenced Friday afternoon to three...   View Post»

War in Afghanistan: A look back from the beginning

On Oct. 7, 2001, the United States launched an assault on Afghanistan in retaliation for the Sept. 11 attacks. Bombs from the air and missiles from the sea hit Osama bin Laden’s adopted nation and his Taliban supporters. In the nine years that followed, Times photographers Carolyn Cole, Don Bartletti, Irfan Khan, Wally Skalij and Rick Loomis were on the ground covering the conflict in Afghanistan and Pakistan. These are a selection of the images they shot. In addition, read about Loomis’ most recent embed with troops in Kandahar here.

3 Comments

  1. October 7, 2010, 9:15 am

    Excerpts from the Sept. 2010 U.N. Report of the Secretary-General:

    "Much of the progress achieved is fragile and continues to be overshadowed by the deterioration in the security situation."

    "I remain concerned by the increasing number of civilian casualties. In particular, Afghan children and women are increasingly being killed and injured in their homes and communities. The human impact of the conflict highlights the fact that measures to protect Afghan civilians effectively and to minimize the impact of the conflict on basic human rights are more urgent than ever. All concerned must do more to protect civilians and comply with their legal obligations under international law."

    What is it about the War in Afghanistan, along with every other war, that blinds people to basic human dignity. Where is our morality? Have we any decency? There is no such thing as a good war or a glorious death. Whatever illusion certain Americans have about the U.S. being, having been, or ever becoming a "Christian," "moral," or "godly" nation is a pipe dream. We are propagating the terror that took us to war in the first place.

    Support the troops. End the war.

    By: N.T. Blount
  2. June 22, 2011, 9:39 pm

  3. June 23, 2011, 1:45 am

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