Framework

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Marta Anguiano at the grave of her son, Luis Ramirez, who fell to his death during a Boy Scout hike in Yosemite. "They told me they were going to the forest," Anguiano said. "They never told me what they were doing was dangerous."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anguiano weeps over the down jacket that Luis was wearing when he died. She has kept all of his clothes. Marisol Mendez, 16, left, was Luis' girlfriend. She often comes over to comfort Luis' mother and be with his siblings.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Luis' school friends come by the house on a regular basis to check in on Anguiano and the family. They often look at old photos and photos from parties celebrating Luis' birthday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Marta cradles the face of her daughter Alondra, 9, before dropping her off at school.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

As the sun sets on their Modesto street, Anguiano plays with her oldest son, Saul Ramirez, 14, in their driveway. The family moved into a new house a year ago. Marta said she had a hard time living in the same home where Luis spent his last days.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anguiano plays a game with her two youngest children, Genesis Anguiano, 7, and Bryan Anguiano, 6.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Genesis, 7, holds a photograph of her brother Luis, as she cleans up her room that she shares with her sister.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anguiano brushes Alondra's hair as the children get ready for school.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anguiano has a shrine in her home dedicated to her late son.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Modesto, CA November 17, 2010 Marta Anguiano's 12-year-old son Luis Ramirez fell to his death during a Boy Scout trip to Yosemite in February 2008. He was hiking up a series of switchbacks in waist deep snow that ParkRangers said they wouldn't attempt without the aid of snow shoes. Ramirez had no experience in hiking in winter conditions. Marta and her 6-year-old son Bryan take an early morning walk in the Ceres Cemetery to visit Luis' grave. Marta tries to visit at least once a week.(Photo by Michael Robinson Chavez/LA Times)

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

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In an examination of law enforcement reports, lawsuits and news accounts, the Times identified 32 Boy Scouts and Scout leaders who have died in the last five years in various outdoor activities. Investigations by rangers and sheriffs have documented deaths resulting from heatstroke, falls, lightning, drowning, electrocution and burns, among others.

In many cases, adult leaders appear to have miscalculated the abilities of individual boys to handle the risks and difficulties of outdoor activities, and failed to follow Scout rules and recommendations on adult supervision, safety equipment and trip planning.

Times photographer Michael Robinson Chavez spent time with one family who lost a son when he fell to his death on a hiking trip in Yosemite. His photographs can be seen in the gallery above. Read Ralph Vartabedian’s full story.

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