Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Protesters on Sunday were demanding that Morocco's ruler, King Mohammed VI, give up some of his powers, dismiss the government and clamp down on corruption.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

The mass rally, marchers said, was aimed at expanding democratic rights in a nation that has long been a hereditary monarchy and at times been as oppressive as its autocratic northern African neighbors.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Demonstrators take to the streets of the capital. Protests also broke out in the business hub of Casablanca, the cities of Marrakech, Tangiers, Fez, Aghadir and smaller towns and villages, according to activists and photographs and video posted to social-media websites.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

The protests Sunday were led by the same type of youthful tech-savvy activists who sparked the toppling of longtime Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Moroccan protesters chanted in Arabic: "The people reject a constitution made for slaves!" and "Down with autocracy!"

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A young demonstrator hoists the Moroccan flag. The leader of the Moroccan Human Rights Organization, Abdelilah Benabdeslam, said Sunday: "We no longer want to be subjects. We want to be citizens."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Protesters clasp hands in solidarity.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A boy carries his message to the top of a streetlight.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A woman wearing a veil joins the protest, which was initiated by a group calling itself February 20th Youth.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Onlookers watched from balconies and hoisted themselves up on lampposts.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Protesters hold a banner calling for constitutional democracy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Moroccan women hold a banner with pictures of men they say are being held as political prisoners by the government.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A woman pauses from hanging laundry to watch the demonstration.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A group of men say afternoon prayers in a traffic median after participating in Sunday's peaceful protest.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Bystanders come to the aid of a man who was knocked down in a scuffle with plainclothes police.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Women gather together in their own section, largely separated from the men, as they join in the protest against the government.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters reassembled in Pearl Square after Crown Prince Salman ibn Hamed Khalifa ordered police to retreat on Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Anti-government protesters take turns speaking to the crowd from a newly erected stage in Manama's Pearl Square on Sunday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Anti-government protesters gather on Sunday morning. At least six Bahrainis have died in the protests since Monday, and hundreds more have been wounded.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An anti-government protester hangs a stuffed animal with a sign that reads "Down Hamad," referring to Bahrain's king, Sheik Hamed ibn Isa Khalifa.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Several tents were erected overnight at the nexus of the protests in Manama as demonstrators prepared for an extended occupation of the area.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters, mainly from Bahrain's Shiite majority, have expressed resentment over the absolute rule by the island's small ruling Sunni family. The demonstrators said they were tired of state corruption, the heavy-handedness of the security forces and a lack of basic freedoms.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Demonstrators chant together Sunday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Racing banners hang along a highway choked to a crawl by anti-government protesters. There were concerns about how the current unrest would affect the upcoming Formula One race.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters can get food, shelter and even a shave in the middle of the large traffic circle that is the Pearl roundabout.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An anti-government protester sleeps on a piece of living room furniture at the protest site.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Spent munitions collected by protesters were put on display.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Men gather for evening prayers at a makeshift camp.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Night falls at the protest site.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

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Demonstrations for democracy begin in Morocco and continue in Bahrain

In the Moroccan capital of Rabat and in cities across the country, tens of thousands of protesters marched peacefully Sunday to demand a new constitution to bring greater democratic reform to the North African kingdom amid the wave of Arab world upheaval. In Bahrain, protesters swept back into Manama’s Pearl Square after Crown Prince Salman ibn Hamed Khalifa ordered troops and armored vehicles to withdraw and offered to lead a national dialogue after days of unrest that had left six dead. The emboldened opposition is demanding a constitutional monarchy that gives citizens a greater role in a directly elected government and the release of political prisoners.

1 Comment

  1. February 20, 2011, 11:55 pm

    [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by burritojustice and Lori Kozlowski, Juan Pablo Puerta. Juan Pablo Puerta said: RT @lorikozlowski: One of Luis Sinco's beautiful photographs from protests today in Morocco: http://lat.ms/gmrfNb (via @latimesphotos) [...]

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