Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

A man stabs an effigy of Libyan dictator Moammar Kadafi on the waterfront in the coastal city.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Young protesters hang an effigy of Moammar Kadafi on a flagpole along the waterfront. The eastern city was one of the first to come under the opposition's control.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Despite pouring rain, protesters gather outside city courthouse, where the revolt began, vowing to continue to resist Kadafi.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Graffiti is splashed on the courthouse, where a protester waves an old national flag that was replaced by Kadafi when he came to power in 1969.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A man covers pictures of political prisoners with plastic as the rain comes down on a rally at the courthouse.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Men and boys clamber aboard a tank abandoned by the army on the waterfront.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Young Libyans at a rally to keep up pressure on Kadafi.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Protesters have adopted the old tricolor national flag in their movement against Kadafi.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Young men with an old national flag pose for pictures on the waterfront.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

People head to Tunisia to flee the violence spreading across Libya. Thousands, many of them guest workers from Egypt and Tunisia, have crossed into Tunisia. Libyan forces at the border confiscated cameras, memory cards and cellphone SIM cards.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

People streamed out of Libya into Tunisia, where they were given food and beverages and boarded onto buses headed away from the border.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

People fleeing into Tunisia board buses taking them away from the border. Many of them are guest workers from Egypt and Tunisia.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Refugees wave Tunisian and pre-Kadafi Libyan flags atop a bus at the border.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Refugees cross into into fleeing the violence in Libya. Libyan forces at the border warned them against painting a negative picture of the events in Libya.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A man weeps as he makes his way over the border carrying a child. Thousands of people, mostly Egyptian and Tunisian guest workers, have fled Libya.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

People cross the border into Tunisia. The opposition movement has been making advances to the west, nearing Tripoli.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A refugee family awaits a bus at the border to travel into Tunisia after fleeing the violence in Libya.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Residents of the eastern city near Benghazi celebrate in the main square after driving out forces loyal to dictator Moammar Kadafi.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A child waving a former national flag is hoisted into the air, as residents celebrate wresting control of their town from government forces.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Residents take to the streets of Derna, after liberating the town from forces loyal to dictator Moammar Kadafi, who has ruled the country since a coup in 1969.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

An Egyptian soldier stands guard at the border with Libya, where roads were jammed as thousands of Egyptian guest workers flee the escalating violence in the oil-rich country.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A driver ties down the belongings of Egyptian workers to the top of his van as thousands flee the political turmoil in Libya.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Egyptian guest workers board a bus to take them home as hundreds of vehicles jam the road out of Libya into neighboring Egypt.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Residents wave the former Libyan flag of black, red and green as they celebrate the liberation of their port city from forces loyal to Kadafi.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Papers are strewn on the floor of the burned central government building.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Egyptian guest workers jam the border road as they flee political turmoil in Libya.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Protesters tear a copy of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi's Green Book as they chant anti-government slogans in the main square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Asmaa Waguih / Reuters

Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi speaks on national television.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Libya State Television / Reuters

Anti-government protesters chant slogans in the main square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Asmaa Waguih / Reuters

Tunisians who had been working and living in Libya ride a pickup truck as they flee back to their homeland.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: LIONEL BONAVENTURE / AFP

Egyptians carry their belongings as they as pass through a border crossing on their way out of Libya and into their homeland.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: AFP

People hold a Tunisian flag and a portrait of Moammar Kadafi with the word "Wanted" during a protest in front of the Libyan Embassy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Fethi Belaid / AFP

Eight-year-old Ali Mohammed uses his shirt sleeve to wipe a tear from his face while riding on top of a car carrying the body of his father, Abdulrheda Mohammed, who was killed during anti-government protests in Bahrain.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters tear down a sign during a demonstration Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Reuters

A protest Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Reuters

Protesters stand on top of a building during a demonstration in the seaport city Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Reuters

Jordanian citizens returning from Libya react after arriving at Queen Alia International Airport. About 300 Jordanians arrived on a flight from Tripoli as violent unrest spread to the Libyan capital.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MUHAMMAD HAMED / Reuters

Ahmed Buhmaid puts a flower on the body of his brother Abdulrheda Mohammed.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Inside the Al Fateh mosque.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An anti-government protester releases balloons over the crowd gathered at the Pearl roundabout Monday evening.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Friends and relatives mourn the death of Abdulrheda Mohammed, who died Monday after suffering a severe head injury Friday during anti-government protests at the Pearl roundabout. His body was moved to the morgue at the Salmaniya Medical Complex and a funeral will be held Tuesday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Pro-monarchy protesters outside the Al Fateh mosque.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Mansoor Tarik rallies a pro-monarchy crowd at the Al Fateh mosque Monday evening. Thousands joined together in support of the king.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Supporters of the king at the Al Fateh mosque.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Bahrainis pray in the Al Fateh mosque as part of a rally to show support for the government.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Posters of Bahrain's royalty are distributed outside the Al Fateh mosque.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi speaks on state television in this image taken from video. He remained defiant.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Libya TV

Jordanian citizens returning from Libya react after arriving at Queen Alia International Airport. About 300 Jordanians arrived on a flight from Tripoli as violent unrest spread to the Libyan capital.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MUHAMMAD HAMED / Reuters

Buildings at the entrance to a security-forces compound are seen burning. Protesters claimed control of the country's second-largest city, and anti-government unrest spread to the capital with clashes in Tripoli's main square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Alaguri / Associated Press

Protesters climb atop a tank in a security compound as they celebrate in the streets Monday, claiming control of Benghazi.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Alaguri / Associated Press

A Libyan air force pilot walks next to his Mirage F1 fighter jet after landing at Malta International Airport outside Valletta. Two Libyan fighter jets and two civilian helicopters landed unexpectedly in Malta, witnesses said. The office of Prime Minister Lawrence Gonzi said it was not clear whether the two fighter pilots intended to ask for asylum.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: DARRIN ZAMMIT LUPI / Reuters

A Libyan man carries away partial remains of a man's body from Al-Jalaa hospital on Monday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Alaguri / AP

A man stands atop a burned guard post at the entrance to a security-forces compound.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Alaguri / Associated Press

A man, right, holds a Libyan national flag that predates the Moammar Kadafi era.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Alaguri / AP

Locals and medical personnel outside the emergency-room entrance to Al-Jalaa hospital. Human-rights groups said the death toll in Libya had exceeded 200 after six days of unrest.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Alaguri / AP

Protesters tear down a sign during a demonstration Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Reuters

A protest Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Reuters

Protesters stand on top of a building during a demonstration in the seaport city Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Reuters

Hundreds gathered Monday in front of the Libyan embassy to demonstrate against Moammar Kadafi.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: AMR ABDALLAH DALSH / X02182

Yemeni anti-government demonstrators deface a banner showing President Ali Abdullah Saleh during a protest Monday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Muhammed Muheisen / Associated Press

Protesters shout slogans, demanding that Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh step down. Saleh rejected those demands Monday. After a week and a half of marches that have left nine dead, President Saleh told a news conference that he ordered the army to fire at demonstrators "only in case of self-defense."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Muhammed Muheisen / Associated Press

An anti-government protester releases balloons over the crowd gathered at the Pearl roundabout Monday evening.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protester Ali Abdali, 27, at Pearl Square, has taped a dinar across his mouth as he protests the Bahraini government.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Midday prayers are held Monday in Pearl Square, where anti-government protestors have gathered to call for change in the wake of other regime changes in the region.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Friends and relatives mourn the death of Abdulrheda Mohammed, who died Monday after suffering a severe head injury Friday during anti-government protests at the Pearl roundabout. His body was moved to the morgue at the Salmaniya Medical Complex and a funeral will be held Tuesday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Ahmed Buhmaid puts a flower on the body of his brother Abdulrheda Mohammed.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Mansoor Tarik rallies a pro-monarchy crowd at the Al Fateh mosque Monday evening. Thousands joined together in support of the king.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Pro-monarchy protesters outside the Al Fateh mosque.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Supporters of the king at the Al Fateh mosque.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Bahrainis pray in the Al Fateh mosque as part of a rally to show support for the government.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Posters of Bahrain's royalty are distributed outside the Al Fateh mosque.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Inside the Al Fateh mosque.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters on Sunday were demanding that Morocco's ruler, King Mohammed VI, give up some of his powers, dismiss the government and clamp down on corruption.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

The mass rally, marchers said, was aimed at expanding democratic rights in a nation that has long been a hereditary monarchy and at times been as oppressive as its autocratic northern African neighbors.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Demonstrators take to the streets of the capital. Protests also broke out in the business hub of Casablanca, the cities of Marrakech, Tangiers, Fez, Aghadir and smaller towns and villages, according to activists and photographs and video posted to social-media websites.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

The protests Sunday were led by the same type of youthful tech-savvy activists who sparked the toppling of longtime Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Moroccan protesters chanted in Arabic: "The people reject a constitution made for slaves!" and "Down with autocracy!"

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A young demonstrator hoists the Moroccan flag. The leader of the Moroccan Human Rights Organization, Abdelilah Benabdeslam, said Sunday: "We no longer want to be subjects. We want to be citizens."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Protesters clasp hands in solidarity.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A boy carries his message to the top of a streetlight.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A woman wearing a veil joins the protest, which was initiated by a group calling itself February 20th Youth.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Onlookers watched from balconies and hoisted themselves up on lampposts.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Protesters hold a banner calling for constitutional democracy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Moroccan women hold a banner with pictures of men they say are being held as political prisoners by the government.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A woman pauses from hanging laundry to watch the demonstration.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A group of men say afternoon prayers in a traffic median after participating in Sunday's peaceful protest.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Bystanders come to the aid of a man who was knocked down in a scuffle with plainclothes police.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Women gather together in their own section, largely separated from the men, as they join in the protest against the government.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters reassembled in Pearl Square after Crown Prince Salman ibn Hamed Khalifa ordered police to retreat on Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Anti-government protesters take turns speaking to the crowd from a newly erected stage in Manama's Pearl Square on Sunday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Anti-government protesters gather on Sunday morning. At least six Bahrainis have died in the protests since Monday, and hundreds more have been wounded.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An anti-government protester hangs a stuffed animal with a sign that reads "Down Hamad," referring to Bahrain's king, Sheik Hamed ibn Isa Khalifa.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Several tents were erected overnight at the nexus of the protests in Manama as demonstrators prepared for an extended occupation of the area.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters, mainly from Bahrain's Shiite majority, have expressed resentment over the absolute rule by the island's small ruling Sunni family. The demonstrators said they were tired of state corruption, the heavy-handedness of the security forces and a lack of basic freedoms.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Demonstrators chant together Sunday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Racing banners hang along a highway choked to a crawl by anti-government protesters. There were concerns about how the current unrest would affect the upcoming Formula One race.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters can get food, shelter and even a shave in the middle of the large traffic circle that is the Pearl roundabout.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An anti-government protester sleeps on a piece of living room furniture at the protest site.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Spent munitions collected by protesters were put on display.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Men gather for evening prayers at a makeshift camp.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Night falls at the protest site.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Anti-government protesters run from tear gas near Pearl Square, the location of earlier protests.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters run through a fog of tear gas enveloping them after they tried to march from Salmaniya Medical Complex to Pearl Square, but were thwarted by security forces. A second attempt to gain entrance to the roundabout was successful and thousands of people occupied the area once again.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Anti-government protesters were met with tear gas as they attempted to march from Salmaniya Medical Complex to Pearl Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Hussein Abdullah, 19, cries out at the funeral of his best friend Ali Ahmed Al Muameen, 23, who was killed by security forces in Bahrain as they cracked down on anti-government protesters that were occupying the Pearl roundabout.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters rejoice after entering Pearl Square, where government forces backed down and allowed thousands to re-occupy the area just before dark.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters raise their arms triumphantly in Pearl Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Army tanks leave the Pearl roundabout on Saturday and by late afternoon anti-government protesters were able to re-occupy the area.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A woman is overcome with emotion at in Pearl Square, which saw the return of thousands of anti-government protesters after they were forcibly removed a day earlier by Bahrain's security forces.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Traffic near the Pearl roundabout came to a standstill as hundreds took to the streets cheering the thousands who came to re-occupy the area after being forcibly removed by government forces a day earlier.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An image of Hamad ibn Isa Al Khalifa, the King of Bahrain, adorns a building that overlooks the Pearl roundabout where protesters have once again returned.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Triumphant protesters wave flags in Pearl Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Thousands of people returned to the Pearl Square roundabout after government forces left their positions where they had been guarding the square after violently forcing out protesters a day earlier.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An anti-government protester moves concertina wire away from the entrance to the Pearl roundabout.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An anti-government protester holds a "triple chaser grenade," which is made in the United States and was deployed in Bahrain in an effort to control the crowds.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters walk past a recently constructed message made of rocks that calls for the ouster of Bahrain's king, Hamad ibn Isa Al Khalifa.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Young Bahraini protesters hold a candlelight vigil after returning to the Pearl roundabout on Saturday evening.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Within hours of re-occupying the Pearl roundabout, protesters had brought in couches and tents as well as a full kitchen and loudspeaker system as they prepared for a sit-in similar to Egypt's Tahrir Square which ended the reign of President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Families moved into tents brought into the Pearl roundabout shortly after it was abandoned by government troops Saturday evening. Within a few hours, protesters had set up a full kitchen, a lost-and-found and a loudspeaker system.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Thousands of people gathered outside Salmaniya Medical Complex after government forces opened fire on protesters for the second time in as many days, injuring several of them.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An injured man is transported to the hospital after being injured when Bahrain's security forces opened up on anti-government protesters for the second time in as many days. Tear gas and live rounds were fired into the crowd as they marched toward the Pearl roundabout.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An injured man yells about the current situation in Bahrain. Several people were transported to a local hospital for treatment from tear gas and gunshot wounds.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Doctors and nurses tend to the wounded at the Salmaniya Medical Complex in Manama, Bahrain, after government security forces fired on demonstrators as they approached the Pearl Square roundabout Friday evening. At least 50 people were injured.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Doctors at the Salmaniya Medical Complex try to save the life of a man with a serious gunshot wound after security forces in Bahrain opened fire on protesters as they tried to make their way to the Pearl roundabout again after being cleared away tear gas the day before.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

The body of Mahmood Makki, 23, is washed and prepped for burial Friday after he was killed early Thursday morning as government forces cleared out the Pearl roundabout which had hundreds of anti-government protesters.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

One of several family members and friends of Ali Ahmed Al Muameen, 23, say their goodbyes before he was buried Friday afternoon after being killed by security forces in Bahrain the day before.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

The body of Mahmoud Makki, 23, is carried through the streets Friday as mourners make their way to the cemetery. Makki was among those killed after Bahraini government forces stormed Pearl Square in Manama on Thursday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

People mourn the loss of Mahmood Makki, 23, who was killed by government forces when he was part of a demonstration on Thursday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Women react as the body of one of those killed by security forces in Bahrain is led through the streets of Sitra on the way to burial. Thousands of people attended the funeral.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

The flag of Bahrain flies during a funeral procession for one of the people killed by security forces.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A woman screams as a funeral procession makes its way through the streets on Friday where three funerals were held for anti-government protesters that were killed on Thursday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Funeral marchers chant as they head to the cemetery for the burial of a person killed by Bahraini security forces.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Pro-government supports took to the streets of Bahrain in their own show of force as they jammed several highways waving flags and cheering their support on Friday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Wearing a Bahrain flag tied into a cape, a man prays with others Friday in the city that hosted three funerals for victims of a government crackdown on protesters at the Pearl roundabout.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Pro-government supporters in favor of King Hamad Ibn Isa Al Khalifa rally along one of Bahrain's highways. Hundreds turned up and blocked the road in several places.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A man cradles his brother's body while mourning his death inside the morgue at Salmanya Medical Complex in Bahrain.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters regrouped at a hospital that was treating the wounded after a government crackdown on their Pearl Square demonstration which had drawn thousands and extended over several days.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters at a local hospital that was treating the wounded after the government crackdown.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Relatives were prevented from leaving the hospital with the body of a protester, so his remains were refrigerated for the night in hopes that they would be permitted to have the burial the next day.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Pearl Square, which was the scene of a police crackdown on protesters gathered there the night before, was cleared out by Thursday afternoon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Tents at the Pearl Roundabout after attack on protesters by government security forces.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: HAMAD I MOHAMMED / Reuters

Bahraini army tanks take up position near Pearl Square. Riot police stormed through the square, firing rubber bullets and tear gas in a harsh crackdown on anti-regime protesters that left three dead, witnesses and opposition said.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: JOSEPH EID / AFP

This image from video shows tear gas filling Pearl Square during an attack by security forces on anti-government protesters.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Tony Mitchell / Tony Mitchell

A Bahraini man is comforted at the hospital in Manama as he grieves for one of those killed in the assault by security forces.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An injured man awaits treatment at the hospital.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A man is rushed into the hospital.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

People chant outside the hospital as ambulances continue to arrive with the wounded.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A woman is overcome at the Salmaniya Medical Complex hospital in Manama.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Men flee from Pearl Square in the center of Manama after security forces bombarded the plaza with tear gas canisters. People were camped out there, many with their families, to signal their intent to stay until their demands for political change were met.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Hassan Ammar / AP

An anti-government demonstrator shows a photo of a wounded man.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Hassan Ammar / AP

Bahraini riot police cluster after the attack, which occurred about 3 a.m.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Hassan Ammar / AP

Tents lie crumpled in Manama's Pearl Square in the aftermath of the raid.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Hassan Ammar / AP

Protesters in Bahrain have been sleeping out as they take part in the wave of anti-government protests sweeping through the region.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Though traffic has returned to Tahrir Square, so have more protesters, including a group of disgruntled policemen carrying an image of a fallen officer they claim is a martyr.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Policemen carry an image of a fallen officer they claim is a martyr through Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

An Egyptian woman sweeps the street near graffiti from the Egyptian uprising.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Life is returning to normal within Tahrir Square. Cafes are open for business and traffic now mingles with protesters and people just coming for a glimpse of the now historical square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Tahrir Square, epicenter of the protests, was cleared by the army, who tore down tents and opened the artery to traffic.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Mohamad Sedki, a high-ranking Egyptian policeman, breaks down in tears upon arriving at Tahrir Square with about 75 other policemen. The police have been hated and feared by the people of Egypt for their harsh treatment, and Sedki came to try to express how he wanted to be united with the people.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Police officers demonstrate in front of the Interior Ministry, looking for pay raises as well as voicing their concern about future retribution for their work under the Hosni Mubarak regime.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A march by police through Tahrir Square was met with joy as well as anger by remaining protesters. Officers, here hoisted on the shoulders of some supporters, claimed solidarity with the protesters.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Mohamad Sedki, a high-ranking Egyptian policeman, has his chin held high by a revolutionary as he breaks down in tears upon arriving into Tahrir Square with about 75 other policemen. The police have long been hated and feared by the people of Egypt for their harsh treatment and Sedki came to try to express how he wanted to be united with the people.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Police demonstrate in front of the Interior Ministry.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An eclectic group of protesters mixed with soldiers and police at Tahrir Square as speeches continued and the army tore down encampments.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

The Egyptian army moves into Tahrir Square to dismantle structures and tents set up by protesters.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Those occupying the downtown square in makeshift tents were asked to move out.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Egyptians did some beautification work around Tahrir Square after weeks of protests left the area in disrepair.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

People relax over tea and coffee at a cafe on the square as businesses reopen.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Traffic was flowing and slowing after 18 days of protests.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An Egyptian woman walks past a wall bearing graffiti from the uprising.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Gihad Adel, 21, center, wears a sheet of paper with the words "Egyptian and proud" printed on it as she cheers with other women who were lined up to protect newly painted sidewalks around Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Members of the Egyptian army, now in charge of the country, work to remove barricades put in place during the 18-day protest in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Workers and volunteers remove one of the barricades that was put in place during 18 days of protest in Egypt which culminated with the resignation of President Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Volunteers from all walks of Egyptian society work to remove the rubble left behind in the aftermath of then 18-day revolution. The area was the scene of a fierce rock battle between pro- and anti-Mubarak forces.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Tahrir Square cleanup volunteers take time to pray underneath the bridge that was the scene of violent clashes during the revolution in Egypt.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A woman documents Tahrir square in the aftermath of the revolution. Egyptians have been feverishly documenting their own movement.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Rocks used to wage fierce battles between pro- and anti-Mubarak forces are being collected from the area around Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

After 18 days of protests that led to the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, anti-regime protesters started the process of cleaning up Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

An Egyptian officer receives a kiss, a traditional greeting among Arab men who are good friends or respectful, from a protester as he walks the area near the square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A shrine was set up in Tahrir Square honoring those killed during the 18 days of protest.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Broom in hand, an Egyptian man starts the process of cleaning up Tahrir Square and surrounding streets.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protesters read a paper and give their opinion of the ousted President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Thousands poured into the square as the celebration of Mubarak's ouster continued on Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Egyptians on Saturday continued to celebrate the sudden departure of President Hosni Mubarak while many others began to return to their homes following 18 days of protests.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Newspapers with accounts of Egypt's revolution were popular on Tahrir Square on Saturday morning, the day after Hosni Mubarak resigned from the presidency.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Makeshift camps for protesters were being broken at a rapid pace Saturday following the successful revolution in Egypt the day before.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An area packed with thousands of protesters on Friday night had just a few remaining after sunrise Saturday morning. There has been a concerted effort to return the square to a normal state following 18 days of occupation during the revolution.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

People camped out on Tahrir Square wake up to a new Egypt on Saturday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Egyptians reach out to one another as they celebrate their revolution.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Blankets that were loaned to protesters during their 18-day revolution are placed piles to be returned on the day after President Hosni Mubarak stepped down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Vehicles trying to enter Tahrir Square while it was still occupied by several thousand people on Saturday morning were turned away by a chain of people.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Abubak Kamal, 29, visits Tahrir Square the morning after Egypt's successful revolution. Kamal said he was hospitalized after being beaten by police, who left him with a broken arm and bruised face during the early days of the revolution.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A man holds up the Egyptian flag after President Hosni Mubarak announced he was handing power over to a military council.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Thousands of people continued to celebrate into the early morning hours of Saturday in Tahrir Square after President Hosni Mubarak announced that he would resign.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters weary from more than two weeks of unrest relax next to army tanks in Tahrir Square. Some soldiers put flags into their rifles as they joined the celebrations.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An Egyptian soldier poses with a protester in Tahrir Square. Soldiers joined in the revelry that erupted in the capital.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Crowds in Tahrir Square celebrate in the early morning hours after President Hosni Mubarak's announcement.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A burned out government building can be seen in the background as people in Tahrir Square celebrate Mubarak's resignation.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Crowds in Tahrir Square cheer on hearing the announcement of President Hosni Mubarak's resignation.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Crowds in Tahrir Square celebrate as they hear the announcement that Mubarak is stepping down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters erupt in joy as President Hosni Mubarak steps down Friday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protest turns to celebration after President Hosni Mubarak stepped down on Friday evening.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

An Egyptian gets emotional during a celebration in the street after hearing that President Hosni Mubarak had stepped down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

The revolution was helped along through social networking and a younger generation that turned out to unseat Hosni Mubarak, who had ruled Egypt for more than 30 years.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

The crowd in Tahrir Square reacts to the announcement that President Hosni Mubarak had stepped down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Egyptians erupted in joy as President Hosni Mubarak stepped down on Friday evening. Jubilant protesters climbed sculptures and walls throughout the downtown area to celebrate the ouster of Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Egyptians dance in the streets of Cairo after the resignation of president Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Fireworks added more spark to the raucous celebration that followed the announcement of Mubarak's departure.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Egyptians have their photos taken next to the tanks that were rolled into the city to protect government buildings and institutions.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protesters celebrate in front of the burned out headquarters of Mubarak's National Democratic Party building in downtown Cairo.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protesters are jampacked in Tahrir Square after President Hosni Mubarak on Thursday evening tells Egyptians that he will not step down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters march from Tahrir Square onto the state-run media building, which was protected by tanks soldiers and barricades, as they sought to expand the protest to other areas of Cairo.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters march from Tahrir Square to the state-run media building which was protected by tanks, soldiers and barricades before Mubarak announced he was stepping down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Members of the army prayed with protesters during noontime prayers inside Tahrir Square before Mubarak announced he was stepping down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Crowds gather inside Tahrir Square for noontime prayers.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters give an angry thumbs down to Mubarak's speech.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Egyptians erupt in anger to President Hosni Mubarak's speech, which was broadcast in Cairo's Tahrir Square and in which he announced that he was not stepping down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An Egyptian protester offers a peace sign when hopes were high that President Mubarak would resign.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A rare rainfall in Tahrir Square energized protesters Thursday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A protester reacts to President Hosni Mubarak's speech Thursday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Egyptians hold their shoes in the air to express their disappointment with President Hosni Mubarak's speech.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Pictures of people killed in the uprising line a street in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Protesters erupt in joy as President Hosni Mubarak steps down Friday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protest turns to celebration after President Hosni Mubarak stepped down on Friday evening.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

An Egyptian gets emotional during a celebration in the street after hearing that President Hosni Mubarak had stepped down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

The revolution was helped along through social networking and a younger generation that turned out to unseat Hosni Mubarak, who had ruled Egypt for more than 30 years.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

The crowd in Tahrir Square reacts to the announcement that President Hosni Mubarak had stepped down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Egyptians erupt in anger Thursday, giving thumbs down in reaction to President Hosni Mubarak's speech, which was broadcast in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Pictures of people killed in the uprising line a street in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Egyptians hold their shoes in the air to express their disappointment with President Hosni Mubarak's speech.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A protester reacts to President Hosni Mubarak's speech Thursday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A rare rainfall in Tahrir Square energized protesters Thursday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

An Egyptian protester offers a peace sign when hopes were high that President Mubarak would resign.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Outside the Egyptian parliament building a woman weeps as people hold up pictures of protesters killed during clashes with police and supporters of President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A soldier passes by protesters and an Egyptian flag that was laid on the ground for afternoon prayers outside the Egyptian parliament.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Demonstrators hold an Egyptian flag outside of the parliament building during the 16th day of unrest and protests in Egypt.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Musician Ramy Essam has written a song entitled "Go Away" that has become an anthem for many of the protesters in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anti-regime protesters poured into Tahrir Square by the tens of thousands on Tuesday. The release of Google executive Wael Ghonim after 12 days of detention reignited the passion in the protesters that many Egyptians had felt was ebbing.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Demonstrators jammed Tahrir Square on Tuesday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

The crowds were fairly thin in the early morning hours Tuesday, but enthusiasm was still strong among protesters who ran through Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

More and more protesters are braving the chilly nights and camping out under an array of tents and plastic sheeting.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A pro-Mubarak supporter who made his way into the center of a massive anti-regime crowd is silenced after shouting his support for the president.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Flags and injured protesters were abundant in Tahrir Square on Monday afternoon as protests continued for a 14th straight day.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anti-regime protesters continued to occupy Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, where martyr posters, images of those killed since the protests began, were being raised in the square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Tanks and protesters remained in the square as night fell on Monday in Egypt.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anti-regime protesters continued to occupy Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo on Sunday. A man weeps and mourns as he holds up an Egyptian newspaper with a set of photos of "Martyrs of the January 23rd Revolution." They are photographs of those killed since the protests started 13 days ago.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Thousands took time to pray on Sunday and welcomed Christians who also gathered with them.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Crowds fill Tahrir Square on Sunday, a day many needed to go back to work.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Despite the lighter mood, many protesters kept a vigilant eye on the barricades at the edge of the square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

The atmosphere was more festive than in days past as enormous crowds filled the square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Egypt's youth and the influence of the internet were on display Sunday in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

CAIRO -- Men form lines in front of Egyptian Army troops near the Egyptian National Museum on Saturday. Negotiations between the Army and protesters ended with the protesters staying put.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

CAIRO -- Men take time to pray, some in tears, during the standoff in Tahrir Square, where thousands of protesters remained throughout the day and into the night on Saturday. Negotiations for them to leave did not succeed.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Anti-regime protesters continued to occupy Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo on Saturday. Egyptian soldiers were also there in greater numbers and were attempting to negotiate with the protesters for them to allow the square to return to normal. Protesters have pushed farther into the downtown area and fortified barricades to prevent pro-Mubarak supporters from gaining access to the square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anti-regime protesters continued to occupy Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo on Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

An anti-regime protester in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo on Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anti-regime protesters in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo on Saturday. Egyptian soldiers were also there in greater numbers. Tanks were moved into position to prevent clashes between pro-Mubarak supporters and the protesters.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A high-ranking Egyptian military officer, center, talks with protesters in Tahrir Square in Cairo in an effort to get them to back off. At right, a protester yells after the soldiers knocked down several barricades.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Men pray in front of the Egyptian army troops near the Egyptian National Museum in Cairo. The standoff in Tahrir Square continues, with thousands of protesters remaining throughout the day on Saturday. Negotiations for them to leave did not succeed.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The standoff in Tahrir Square in Cairo continues, with thousands of protesters remaining throughout the day on Saturday, some sitting in front of the army tanks to keep them there for protection.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Anti-regime protesters use makeshift metal barricades as they call for the departure of President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ / Los Angeles Times

Tens of thousands of anti-Mubarak protesters gather in Tahrir Square on Friday in what turned out to be a peaceful day, which they called a day of departure for President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

An anti-Mubarak protester, armed with paving stones, guards the perimeter of Tahrir Square against supporters of the Egyptian president.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Tens of thousands of anti-Mubarak protesters gather in Tahrir Square on Friday in what turned out to be a relatively peaceful day. At noon, they lined up for Friday prayers before continuing to voice their demand for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Men participate in noontime prayers in Tahrir Square, where tens of thousands massed in protest of President Hosni Mubarak's rule.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ / Los Angeles Times

Protesters filled Tahrir, or Liberation, Square on Friday, shouting for President Hosni Mubarak's departure from the country.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MICHAEL ROBINSON CHAVEZ / Los Angeles Times

Anti-Mubarak protesters move past their barriers in Tahrir Square as they push supporters of the Egyptian president back.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anti-Mubarak protesters throw rocks at rival pro-Mubarak forces at the edge of Liberation Square. The protesters were able to push back the rival group several blocks.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

An anti-Mubarak protester mourns the death of his brother at a site on the front line of clashes where a pool of blood remains.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Anti-Mubarak protesters throw rocks at rival group pro-Mubarak forces at the edge of Liberation Square in what was the second day of violent clashes.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Anti-Mubarak protesters hide behind shields at the edge of Liberation Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

An anti-Mubarak protester lies down in the streets to prevent an Egyptian tank from entering Liberation Square and knocking one the the barricades set up by the protesters to keep back pro-Mubarak forces. Rocks litter the ground and pro-Mubarak supporters can be seen on the overpass.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

An anti-Mubarak protester climbs up a rope to help support other protesters on the overpass. They also hoisted buckets of rocks to the upper level to use in the battle against he rival group pro-Mubarak forces at the edge of Liberation Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Anti-Mubarak protesters beat a suspected policeman that got trapped behind their lines as they advance on pro-Mubarak supporters.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anti-regime protesters hurl rocks at pro-Mubarak supporters from atop a building. The burned out building that housed Mubarak's party headquarters is at rear.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Soldiers moved in to separate the two sides.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anti-Mubarak protesters carry a wounded man from the front lines to a make shift medical clinic nearby.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A soldier moves in to protect a suspected policeman from anti-regime protesters.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Pro-Mubarak supporters line a bridge overlooking anti-regime positions.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

An injured anti-regime protester is cared for on the ground of Tahrir Square. Many fear even larger clashes on Friday, the traditional Muslim holy day.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Fighting and clashes continued for a second day around Tahrir Square Thursday afternoon between Mubarak supporters and detractors. A supply of stones lie atop an Egyptian flag, ready for the clashes that went all day and through the night.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

There were moments when both sides laid down their arms and even embraced. They were fleeting however, and fighting would resume within minutes.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

The battle raged into the night with pro Mubarak forces, left, setting a car on fire and advancing with corrugated tin shields against the anti-regime protesters, right.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A pro-Mubarak supporter is set upon by those favoring regime change.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anti-Mubarak protesters throw rocks at loyalists from behind a barricade in Cairo on Wednesday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

An injured anti-Mubarak protester receives first aid Wednesday at a makeshift clinic in a mosque near Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A woman weeps at the chaos surrounding her in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

People tend to an injured man in Tahrir Square in Cairo.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Two anti-Mubarak protesters make their way out of a medial clinic in a mosque off of Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

An injured man is taken to a makeshift clinic off of Tahrir Square after clashes between pro- and anti-government groups.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Mubarak supporters, some riding camels and horses, rally in the middle-class neighborhood of Mohandiseen before clashes in Tharir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A pro-Mubarak supporter kisses a portrait of President Hosni Mubarak in the middle-class neighborhood of Mohandiseen.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A clash between pro-Mubarak backers, foreground, and anti-Mubarak protesters turned violent on Wednesday when they met at the edge of Tahrir Square. The two groups threw rocks and other items at each other and had to be broken up by security forces.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

An anti-Mubarak protester holds an Egyptian flag aloft at the front line of the battles between the two sides.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

An injured man is tended to after fighting between pro- and anti-government forces resulted in hundreds of injuries.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Fighting and clashes broke out around Tharir Square on Wednesday between Mubarak supporters and detractors.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protesters voice their displeasure with the Mubarak regime while standing atop pieces of burned-out vehicles.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Emotion shows on the faces of some of the more than 100,000 marchers in Egypt's second-largest city.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A marcher holds a torn identification card from the National Democratic Party, the party of President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Anti-government marchers are seen through the screen of a burned-out police truck.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protesters gather under fair skies for one of the many demonstrations across the country calling for the departure of President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

More than 100,000 people march through the streets, part of the wave of rallies calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

With tanks nearby, Egyptians pray at sunset during the massive protest in Tahrir Square

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

With army troops standing nearby but not interfering, hundreds of thousands of Egyptian protesters gather in Tahrir Square

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A group of men, part of the huge crowd in Tahrir Square, voice their opposition to the government of President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A large banner that reads "GONE" is held by protesters in Tahrir Square as hundreds of thousands of Egyptians rally to call for the departure of President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Men stand guard around Egyptian army tanks to prevent other protesters from crowding around.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Protesters in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Protesters remain in Tahrir Square after Mubarak's speech.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Protesters on Tuesday react to the statement by President Hosni Mubarak that he will stay in office until the presidential election in September and will not run again. They were not satisfied.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Soldiers escort suspected looters.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Soldiers arrest a suspected looter. Although looting has diminished compared with previous days, the army is still making arrests.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Egyptian soldiers patrol the streets of Cairo in an attempt to calm the chaos, stop looting.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protestors get their point across by adding touches of Hitler to President Hosni Mubarak's image.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Some Egyptians, including children, wielded bats and sticks, aiming to protect their neighborhoods. In a poor section of the city of Suez, outsiders are questioned.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Helicopters flew over protesters in Tahrir Square throughout the day Monday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

An ax-wielding Abdel Ibrahim, 24, is among a group of men helping to protect a poor neighborhood. Egyptians across the country are concerned with safety because looters have taken advantage of the security vacuum.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A downtown Egyptian National Democratic Party building, center, smolders after dark.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Some protestors spent the night in Tahrir Square, despite a government curfew, greeting helicopters flying over them in the early-morning hours Monday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protesters continue to defy a government-imposed curfew and have been spending Sunday night in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

The Egyptian army has taken command of the city now that police have abandoned their positions. At least 15 more tanks rolled into the city center near Tahrir Square on Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A soldier asks people to stand back as a tank moves its position.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Some linked arms and stood in the path of tanks moving toward downtown on Sunday afternoon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A woman watches from an overpass as more members of the Egyptian army roll into downtown near Tahrir Square. There are no police at their stations in the city.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A lone man steps into the path of an oncoming tank near Tahrir Square on Sunday afternoon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Tensions between some protesters and the military were on the rise. This man, however, offered soldiers cigarettes outside the Egyptian Museum on Sunday afternoon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protesters on Sunday continue to voice their demand for the departure of President Hosni Mubarak.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The burned-out National Democratic Party building, housing President Mubarak's ruling party, is a backdrop to activity downtown in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Men, in the path of an army tank, shout their displeasure with President Mubarak Sunday afternoon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Egyptian army tanks roll into the city center, where thousands of people had gathered by Sunday afternoon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A pause for prayer is taken Sunday in downtown Cairo, where the Egyptian army had taken command after police abandoned their positions.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A shopping mall was looted and burned in downtown Cairo.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Hundreds of people swarmed Cairo International Airport on Sunday in an attempt to leave the country.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

Protesters continue to defy the government-imposed curfew and have been spending Sunday night in Tahrir Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

A man leaves a looted shopping mall that had been set on fire.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Many of the protesters are young men and boys who are running through the streets celebrating as word was announced of the changes in the government structure.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

With tear gas in the air, the streets were filled with celebration as word was announced of the changes in the government structure.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Protesters climb atop on Egyptian army armored vehicle.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The streets were filled with celebration as civilians rode on tanks and other armored vehicles as word was announced of the changes in the government structure. The Egyptian army was present, but no riot police could be seen.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The Egyptian army was in the streets and could be seen greeting protesters. A few women could be seen in the streets.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

An injured man is carried through the streets, his leg bloodied.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Civilians mixed with soldiers in the celebration.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Men add fuel to the fire burning in front of party headquarters in Tahrir Square where protests continued into the night.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

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Documenting a wave of political unrest across the Middle East and North Africa

As political unrest spread across the Middle East and North Africa, the Los Angeles Times dispatched photojournalists Michael Robinson Chavez, Carolyn Cole, Rick Loomis and Luis Sinco to cover the often-violent clashes between anti-government protesters and government forces. Cole, Robinson Chavez and Loomis documented the uprising in Cairo that drove Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak from office. Loomis then followed the wave of unrest to Bahrain and is in Tunisia documenting the refugees fleeing the violence in Libya. Sinco was dispatched to cover demonstrations in Morocco and has since entered Libya, where he is photographing the rebellion against Libyan President Moammar Kadafi. The gallery above looks back at their work covering the demonstrations and celebrations that have taken place over the last several weeks.

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