Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

U.S. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, the supreme Allied commander, talks with men of the American Division on June 6, 1944, before they joined the D-Day invasion.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

U.S. serviceman attend a Protestant service aboard a landing craft before the D-Day invasion on the coast of France, June 5, 1944.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Peter J. Carroll / Associated Press

U.S. paratroopers fix their static lines before a jump before dawn over Normandy on D-Day June 6, 1944, in France.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: ARMY SIGNAL CORPS

Off the British coast, this huge fleet of warships, transports and landing craft awaits the signal to get underway for the allied invasion of Northern France, June 6, 1944.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

A U.S. Coast Guard landing barge, tightly packed with helmeted soldiers, approaches the shore at Normandy, France, during initial Allied landing operations, June 6, 1944.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: U.S. COAST GUARD

Troops wade ashore in Normandy the D-day invasion of France, June 6, 1944.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: NATIONAL ARCHIVES

Some of the first assault troops to hit the beachhead take cover behind enemy obstacles. Landing craft in background try to unload more troops.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

Allied troops struggle through the surf on the obstacle-strewn beaches of Normandy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

Members of an American landing unit help their exhausted comrades ashore during the Normandy invasion, June 6, 1944. The men reached the zone code-named Utah Beach, near Sainte Mere Eglise, on a life raft after their landing craft was hit and sunk by German coastal defenses.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: U.S. ARMY

American assault troops move onto a beachhead code-named Omaha Beach, on the northern coast of France on June 6, 1944, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy coast.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: U.S. ARMY

Troops lie low under the fire of Nazi guns on a beach in France on D-day. One invader operates a walkie talkie, directing other landing craft to the safest spots for unloading.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

American troops move over the crest of a hill.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

The successful assault on Normandy's beaches came at a high cost to the Allies. Thousands of soldiers drowned or were felled by enemy fire, mines and other deadly obstacles.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: UPI / Bettmann

Men and assault vehicles storm the Normandy Beach of France, as allied landing craft arrive at their destination on D-Day , June 6, 1944.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

Soldiers of the 2nd Canadian Flotilla are carrying bicycles as they disembark their LCI's at a beachhead code-named Juno Beach, at Bernieres-sur-mer, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy on June 6, 1944.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

Wounded British troops from the South Lancashire and Middlesex regiments are being helped ashore at Sword Beach, June 6, 1944, during the D-Day invasion of German occupied France during World War II.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: BRITISH NAVY

After landing at the shore, these British troops wait for the signal to move forward, during the initial Allied landing operations in Normandy, France, June 6, 1944.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

A view from overhead shows Allied trucks advancing up the Normandy beach while just offshore the massive invasion fleet carrying more troops and materiel waits.

Amphibious trucks and a half-track follow troops ashore during the World War II opening invasion of France on a 100-mile front along the Normandy coast by Allied forces on June 6, 1944.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: U.S. COAST GUARD

Allied trucks advance along a beach while under fire on D-day.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: U.S. Navy

German prisoners of war are led away by Allied forces from Utah Beach, on June 6, 1944, during landing operations at the Normandy coast, France.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: U.S. ARMY

An American soldier gives a drink of water to a German prisoner wounded in the invasion.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: UPI / Bettmann

Medical orderlies cover the dead.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: UPI / Bettmann

A view of Omaha Beach in June 1944 during Operation Overlord, the code name for the Normandy invasion during World War II. Large landing craft put troops and supplies onshore at Omaha, one of five invasion beaches. In the background is part of the fleet of 2,727 ships that brought allied troops from Britain. In the air are barrage balloons, designed to entangle low-flying attack aircraft in their cables.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

More galleries on Framework

return to gallery

Dramatic ending to BCS finale at Rose Bowl

Dramatic ending to BCS finale at Rose Bowl

By Bill Plaschke The ornery BCS expired loudly, perfectly, kicking and screaming into the chilly darkness. The loony BCS took its last breath Monday by taking...   View Post»

   

Betty Ford memorial

Betty Ford services

Former First Lady Betty Ford's body was flown Wednesday to Grand Rapids, Mich., for a funeral and burial Thursday on the grounds of the Gerald R. Ford Museum. Memorial...   View Post»

   

Remembering D-Day

Fernandomania: The Fernando Valenzuela years

It has been 30 years since Fernandomania spawned a whole new generation of Dodgers fans. Still one of the most popular Dodgers in franchise history, here we bring you the...   View Post»

   

Remembering D-Day

Pictures in the News | Mar. 10, 2011

Saif Islam Kadafi, the son of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi, addresses a group of supporters in Tripoli, pledging to take the fight to the rebellious east of the country; a rebel...   View Post»

Remembering D-Day

On  June, 6, 1944 Allied forces landed on a swath of beaches in Nazi-occupied France in World War II’s most ambitious operation. The invasion and ensuing battle for Normandy helped change the course of the war.

Related:

Remembrances of D-Day

3 Comments

  1. June 6, 2011, 1:41 pm

    On this day, my mother who is 100 years old, and I were on the road (in Tennessee) from Long Beach, California to New York City to see my father (deceased) who had returned from the war in the Pacific after 2 and a half years. I was 10 years old and remember listening to the news reports on the radio in the car. Ruben Ingram

    By: ringram@seacal.org
  2. June 6, 2011, 4:53 pm

    My father, a recently deceased WWII vet, served many air support missions leading up to D-Day. This country owes every single one of these gentleman a full debt of gratitude. My dad used to say if his generation didnt win, we'd all be speaking German today

    By: caseminole@yahoo.com
  3. June 6, 2012, 4:46 pm

    Thank You, for your Lives Lost. The America you fought for is gone. You would cry, if you guys & Gals where here today. The D-Day invasion, was barely mentioned.

    By: upmayo@att.net

Add a comment or a question.

If you are under 13 years of age you may read this message board, but you may not participate. Here are the full legal terms you agree to by using this comment form.

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until they've been approved.

Required

Required, will not be published