Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Dave Lumian, left and George Wolfe, right, along with others, walk their crafts through a section of the L.A. River where the water was too low for paddling. The river was recently declared a traditional navigable waterway, though this particular section was only navigable on foot.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Glen Jochimsen makes his way past a large graffiti image painted on the concrete banks of the L.A. River during a section known as the Glendale Narrows.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Looking from a bike trail near Griffith Park (Zoo Drive and the 134 Fwy), the Los Angeles River flows towards downtown Los Angeles during part of its 51-mile route through 13 cities.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

Kayakers make their way down the L.A. River near Atwater Village.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

George Wolfe and Joe Linton walk their vessels through the shallows as they head down the L.A. River during a recent trip after the river's waters were declared a traditional navigable waterway.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Glen Jochimsen makes his way down the L.A. River with the 5 Freeway freeway visible in the distance. The river, at 51 miles in length, was recently declared a traditional navigable waterway.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

A fern makes its home underneath one of the bridges that spans the L.A. River near Atwater Village.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Richard Le, originally from Saigon, Vietnam, pulls a carp out of the L.A. River during a recent fishing trip. Le says he doesn't eat the fish coming out of the river, just catches and releases them.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Rushing water cascades around boulders in the L.A. River near Atwater Village.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

Joe Linton paddles through a picturesque section of the L.A. River which is more often associated with concrete than lush greenery.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times

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Kayaking down the Los Angeles River

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Kayaking down the Los Angeles River

City-sanctioned canoe and kayak excursions along a placid, 3-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River in the San Fernando Valley’s Sepulveda Basin are expected to start in July. The three-hour journeys will be offered on weekends at a cost of $50 per person. Participants will be chaperoned by a Los Angeles Conservation Corps naturalist. The goals of the pilot program include raising awareness of the river and its history. The images in the gallery above were taken in 2010 shortly after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated the river a “traditional navigable waterway.”

Read Louis Sahagun’s article and watch the video.

6 Comments

  1. June 25, 2011, 3:14 pm

    What fun! But how in the world can an artificial, concrete-lined ditch, be designated a “traditional navigable waterway”??

    By: glynes@glay.org
  2. June 28, 2011, 10:43 am

    It is a natural waterway that was lined with concrete in order to allow the creation of the dense and sprawling Los Angeles metropolis.

    By: michelle
  3. June 26, 2011, 9:11 am

    Bad idea. The L.A.River is one of the few water stops for migratory birds. Leading groups of clueless yuppies into the river will damage plants, scare and dameg the birds and animals that call this place home. Why must the majority of Angelenos kowtow to the almost always misused political power of yuppies hipsters and yipsters??

    By: garagehero
  4. December 10, 2013, 7:46 pm

    From Alaska to Mexico, The L.A river makes up .00000000000001 percent of the Pacific Flyway. If you want to talk about loss of bird habitat then we can start with L.A.D.W.P and the owens river and the water that everyone uses. including annoying "activists"

    By: murderbots@gmail.com
  5. June 27, 2011, 5:20 am

    Garagehero I am neither a yuppie, hippie or groupie and I certainly am not clueless. Silent kayaks and canoes are one of the many tools used by conservationist and naturalist to study birds. It is neither intrusive nor damaging to this waterway. If you want to talk of abuse take a look at the water way after a weekend of spin fisherman leaving their trash, such as, bait jars, food bags, cans and fishing line that entangle birds. After a storm do you go down to the water and remove all the trash from the trees? Do you carry a trash bag with you and pick up refuse left from others Angelenos who don't give a damn? Stop complaining and become an activist. Do something for this sad waterway, instead of bad-mouthing.

    By: fflutterffly
  6. December 10, 2013, 7:59 pm

    Not sure why you are so focused on fisherman… Are you sure it has nothing to do with the 16 million people in the LA area connected via sewer to the "river"? The people fishing in the LA river aren't exactly the smartest people in the world either. Stupid people litter. Doesn't matter if they are fishing or not….Its not a sad waterway. Its a sewer. The river was ruined along time ago.

    By: murderbots@gmail.com

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