Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

With the weak economy, tourism has been slow on the U.S. side of Niagara Falls. A conditional lifting of a ban on death-defying acts clears the way for high-wire star Nik Wallenda to walk across the falls. The legislation passed the New York state Senate last month.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Suni Frese and her daughter, Natalie Frese, 8, of Kansas, have their picture taken at American Falls.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Visitors on the American Falls from the Cave of the Winds tour on the U.S. side of Niagara Falls

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

James Manning waits for visitors to the Wax Museum at Niagara on a slow evening.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A woman walks down a nearly deserted street in Niagara Falls, N.Y., where the population has fallen by half since 1960.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Oakwood Cemetery in Niagara Falls, N.Y., houses the grave of Annie Edson Taylor; she became the first person to go over the falls in a barrel and live on Oct. 24, 1901. Buried beside her is Carlisle Graham, who was the first to ride a barrel through the rapids at the falls' base in 1886.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Niagara Falls' Daredevil Museum has displays of various people who have attempted to go over the falls.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Members of the Wares family, from Orlando, Fla., have their picture taken at the Daredevil Museum, where there is a display of barrels people have used to attempt to go over the falls.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

At the Daredevil Museum, an old photograph show a tightrope walker over the falls. Such stunts have been banned for 50 years.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

At the Daredevil Museum, a collection of old stereo photographs shows tightrope walkers of the past.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Visitors look out at the American Falls as seen from the U.S. side of Niagara Falls. On the Canadian side, officials spent years building a bustling tourist industry; the U.S. side banked on factories to pay the bills. Those factories are gone.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

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Niagara Falls hopes to boost economy with high-wire act

High-wire artist Nik Wallenda plans to cross Niagara Falls on a wire the width of a nickel. The performance would be featured on a Discovery Channel show expected to begin airing later this year. To clear the way for the spectacle, legislators last month approved a one-time exemption from a 50-year-old ban on daredevil acts at the falls. Read Tina Susman’s story.

1 Comment

  1. August 4, 2011, 8:34 pm

    Niagara Falls is dead because of decades of Democrat taxing habits. Take it from a former resident — death of Niagara Falls, New York came at the hands of Democrats who taxed industry so hard that it mostly left. Then, over the decades, as more businesses left, the geniuses decided to keep increasing taxes to make up for the difference. All that is left is the underclass who suck up Obama foodstamps and WIC checks. The residents, on the whole, vote enmass for Democrats every time. Believe it or not, wanting a change — a real change. But it never happens. Just the same old "let's increase taxes on the economic survivors." And when these people leave, let's raise taxes again. Anyone who starts a business in Niagara Falls, NY is a fool or a dreamer. And one other thing, Democrat cronies will be the only ones who profit from this latest silver bullet city saving scheme. Folks, if you visit the area, do yourselves a favor — GO TO THE CANADIAN SIDE!!!!

    By: Gerry

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