Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Two people climb over the damaged Route 4 in Killington, Vt, on Tuesday. National Guard helicopters rushed food and water Tuesday to a dozen Vermont towns cut off by flooding.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Vyto Starinskas / Rutland Herald

Lindsey Jones makes her way down floodwater-damaged Route 4 in Woodstock. Jones, who is from Virginia, has been hiking the Appalachian trail for two months and took shelter with an acquaintance in White River Junction, Vt. She says it will take her two days to return to the trail head due to road closures across the state.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Polina Yamshchikov / Calley News

Workers grade an alternate roadbed alongside Route 4 in Mendon, Vt., on Tuesday, washed out by flood waters. Vermont Emergency Management officials say they'll use helicopters to airlift food, water and supplies to flood-stricken towns that have been cut off by road and bridge washouts.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Toby Talbot / Associated Press

A house was destroyed about a mile south of Pittsfield, Vt.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Vyto Starinskas / The Rutland Herald

A man walks across the road near a flooded section of Highway 23 in Wayne, N.J.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Lucas Jackson / Reuters

Trucks sit in a flooded parking lot in New Jersey as the region continues to struggle Tuesday with its worst flooding in decades, two days after Hurricane Irene slammed an already soaked Northeast with torrential rain.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: LUCAS JACKSON / Reuters

A man surveys the damage to a three-story home that collapsed during the storm on Sunday on Cosey Beach.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Cloe Poisson / Hartford Courant

Andy Weinstein, of Woodbridge, peers into what was once the living room of his family's summer cottage on Cosey Beach Avenue in East Haven. The Weinsteins bought the house four years ago after renting for several seasons.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Cloe Poisson / Hartford Courant

A lone cottage sits surrounded by water along the Connecticut shoreline after Hurricane Irene caused major flooding in the state.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: John Woike / Hartford Courant

Flood waters remain several feet deep in Wayne. New Jersey and Vermont continue to struggle with their worst flooding in decades on Tuesday, two days after Hurricane Irene slammed an already soaked U.S. Northeast with torrential rain, dragging away homes and submerging neighborhoods.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Lucas Jackson / Reuters

A produce store in Ship Bottom lets customers know Hurricane Irene didn't knock them out of business. Shore towns recovering from the storm hope tourists weren't scared away for the last week and a half of the summer season.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Wayne Parry / Associated Press

A tractor trailer drives through the flood water that goes up and over his headlights on Secaucus Road after Hurricane Irene caused major flooding in the area over the weekend.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Pamela Suchy / The Jersey Journal

A man maneuvers his boat near a rescue team through a flood caused by Hurricane Irene in Wayne.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Lucas Jackson / Reuters

Floodwater caused by Hurricane Irene rushes along Route 73, tearing up the road as it flows. Entire towns in Vermont and New York remained cut off by flooding and some communities were still warily watching swollen rivers after heavy rains from Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Hans Pennink / Associated Press

A lock on the Mohawk River in Rotterdam, N.Y., is overwhelmed with floodwater.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Patrick Dodson / The Daily Gazette

Greg Austin of Avon, N.C., tries to save a fish that was washed out of a local pond during the storm surge from Hurricane Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chuck Liddy / The News & Observer

Jarrid Gonyea and his wife, Michelle, of Wilmington, N.Y., walk on a road heavily damaged by the storm.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Hans Pennink / Associated Press

Ashley Isbrecht carries a ceramic figurine outside the Hatteras Island Toy Store in Avon, N.C., as she helps with the cleanup Monday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chuck Liddy / The News & Observer

The 100-year-old Pea Island lifeguard station was toppled by the storm.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ted Richardson / Bloomberg

North Main Street is underwater in the wake of Irene. Almost 50,000 Vermont utility customers were without power Monday, hundreds of roads were closed and a number of bridges were destroyed by the storm.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: GLENN RUSSELL / Free Press

Grand Central station is unusually quiet at the start of Monday morning's rush hour as the city continues to try to get back to normal. The rail system was on a limited schedule Monday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Joe Raedle / Getty Images

State Route 12, the main road on Cape Hatteras National Seashore, was severely damaged by the storm.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: JOSE LUIS MAGANA / Reuters

A man runs along the Coney Island beach at dawn.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mario Tama / Getty Images

Water rushes over the Ascutney Mill Dam on Kennedy's Pond.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: James M. Patterson / Valley News

Firefighter Mandy Drake clears a storm drain in front of a fire station on Monday. The building was evacuated as high water from the Winooski River flooded downtown.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: GLENN RUSSELL / Free Press

A house lies wrecked by Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Cathy Zuraw / The Connecticut Post

Part of State Route 12 was wiped away by the storm surge from Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chuck Liddy / Raleigh News & Observer

Ken Smith clears the street Sunday in front of his house in the Rockaway Beach section of Queens, N.Y.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: JESSICA RINALDI / Reuters

Spc. Caleb Lowery with the Army National Guard helps clean out a homeowner's hot tub on Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: CHRIS SEWARD / Raleigh News & Observer

Irene battered the beachfront on Hatteras Island.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jim R. Bounds / Associated Press

Waves crash into a seawall Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Winslow Townson / Associated Press

Nick Krashefski looks out at the water after Hurricane Irene destroyed his home.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bettina Hansen / Hartford Courant

On the Brooklyn Heights Promenade overlooking Lower Manhattan on Sunday, Francesca Tate, accompanied by her husband Jim Tate, talks to her friend in Boston to see how the storm is there. The skies over New York City had already begun to clear by noon Sunday after Hurricane Irene moved north.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

In Brooklyn Heights on Hicks Street, a large tree fell across the street during Hurricane Irene. Neighbors gather Sunday to view the damage.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A man walks in Times Square as Hurricane Irene arrives on Sunday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mike Groll / Associated Press

Waves and storm surge pound the boardwalk and the beach at first light Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: CHIP EAST / Reuters

A car sits submerged Sunday after Peddie Lake overflowed because of Hurricane Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jim Gerberich / Associated Press

Flood debris litters the street as a resident surveys damage from Irene. The storm hit Dare County, which sits along the Outer Banks and includes the vacation towns of Nags Head, Kitty Hawk and Kill Devil Hills.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Scott Olson / Getty Images North America

Sand covers the boardwalk after Irene passed through.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MOLLY RILEY / Reuters

Emily Santiago, right, leads Sasha Williams and Burton Chirinos as they wade through water on Lower Manhattan's South Street, where Hurricane Irene caused some flooding as the East River spilled over the seawall.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A jogger runs through water pushed by Hurricane Irene across his path along the East River.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Alexis Noa, right, and Efia Senior wade along a flooded South Street.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The Noa family, including Alexis Noa, front left, and Nadine Noa, center, along with a friend Efia Senior, right, wade through a flooded South Street.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Police block the street around a utility pole downed by Hurricane Irene in Montauk on the east end of Long Island in New York.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Peter Foley / European Pressphoto Agency

Residents look at downed power lines after Hurricane Irene. More than 4 million homes and businesses were without power Sunday morning as Hurricane Irene continued up the East Coast.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Susan Walsh / Associated Press

Branches litter an alley as a result of Hurricane Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Brendan Hoffman / Getty Images

Brian Grant and Bob Bianchini, engineers from the public works department out for a safety inspection, are slammed by waves and storm surge pounding the seashore at first light Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chip East / Reuters

The American flag flies in tatters above the U.S. Capitol after Hurricane Irene moved through the nation's capital.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Win McNamee / Getty Images

The looming threat of Hurricane Irene did not dissuade tourists from visiting Manhattan's Times Square.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: John Minchillo / Associated Press

A man stands in the center of a nearly deserted 7th Avenue in Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mike Segar / Reuters

Stranded cars are surrounded by flood waters in lower Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mike Segar / Reuters

A street sign knocked over by Hurricane Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Patrick Smith / Getty Images

Denise Robinson, left, and Rich Brown clear out belongings from her severely damaged beach home in the Sandbridge area of Virginia Beach.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Steve Helber / Associated Press

A man crosses an empty Times Square late Saturday as Hurricane Irene approaches the region.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chelsea Matiash / Associated Press

A road sign warns of inclement weather as a pedestrian crosses Canal St. in front of the Manhattan bridge in Lower Manhattan on Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mary Altaffer / Associated Press

A man wears a garbage bag to protect himself from the rain as he walks with others over the Williamsburg Bridge on Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mary Altaffer / Associated Press

A tornado generated by Hurricane Irene touched down Saturday in the Old Orchard Road and New Road area west of Lewes, Del., damaging several homes and uprooting trees.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chuck Snyder / The Daily Times

A Wayne County water rescue team maneuvers around a boat that washed inland onto Highway 304 near Mesic.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chris Seward / Raleigh News & Observer

Contractor Denis Hromin, who recently did construction work on Avalon Pier, inspects the structure during the onslaught of Hurricane Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: JIM LO SCALZO / European Pressphoto Agency

Jason Justus of the Henderson County Swift Water Rescue Team checks a damaged mobile home for occupants.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Travis Long / Raleigh News & Observer

Floodwaters caused by Hurricane Irene surround homes on Highway 304 near Mesic. A Wayne County water rescue team rescued eight people from the home in the background at right.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chris Seward / Raleigh News & Observer

Evonne Krager. who had to evacuate from her apartment in Lower Manhattan's Tribeca neighborhood, walks in Times Square, near where she is staying with friends.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A security officer waits and watches in a building in New York's Financial District.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The hurricane-force winds of Irene rip the siding off homes late Saturday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Stephen M. Katz / The Virginian-Pilot

Damaged power lines are evident as Hurricane Irene hits the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina. Irene came ashore near Cape Lookout as a weakened but still massive Category 1 hurricane, packing sustained winds of 85 mph.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP/Getty Images

Several mobile homes on the North Carolina coast are damaged by the storm.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chuck Burton / Associated Press

A window displays a message crafted in tape at Serenity Spa on 6th Avenue in New York City. Many stores in New York closed for the weekend due to Irene, which was expected to hit the city Sunday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Andrew Burton / Getty Images

Sailors attached to a cermonial guard unit run through the streets of the nation's capital during a pouring rain as Hurricane Irene approached.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Win McNamee / Getty Images

Alora Goldsmith 10, battles the wind and rain as Hurricane Irene arrives.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jim R. Bounds / Associated Press

People run toward the West 72nd Street subway station shortly before New York's subway system was shut down at noon Saturday in preperation for Hurricane Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Andrew Burton / Getty Images

Isabella Lugli braces herself as a wave bursts onto a pier at Florida's Boynton Beach inlet, as Hurricane Irene approaches the United States.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Joe Raedle / Getty Images

People wait to enter a temporary shelter as Irene approaches.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: TIMOTHY A. CLARY / AFP/Getty Images

More than 275 people and 75 pets ride out the storm at this American Red Cross shelter at Indian River High School.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: SUCHAT PEDERSON / The News Journal

Juliana Beasley takes her dogs, Moishe and Howard, on the subway while evacuating from Jersey City, N.J., to stay with a friend in Brooklyn. Before New York's subway system closed down in preparation for the storm, pets were allowed on trains to encourage people to evacuate.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

A Metropolitan Transportation Authority employee fills an artificial barrier known as an AquaDam on Long Island Rail Road tracks at Penn Station. The barrier was installed to help keep floodwaters out of Penn Station's tunnels.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: John Kettel / NY MTA

Workers place sandbags in front of the New York Stock Exchange in preparation for the storm.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

As the rain begins to fall at dusk, a man walks on Broad Street near the New York Stock Exchange. Few people remained on the streets of Lower Manhattan as Irene approached.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A conductor prepares to close the doors of the last subway train out of Coney Island, an area under mandatory evacuation order in advance of Hurricane Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: EMMANUEL DUNAND / AFP/Getty Images

A truck plows through a flooded roadway in Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: JOSE LUIS MAGANA / Reuters

People hurry on the boardwalk through the rain and wind as Hurricane Irene bears down.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Evans / Assoicated Press

Shore birds hunker down, facing into a strong wind, while an emergency response truck makes the rounds.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Karl Merton Ferron / Baltimore Sun

As Hurricane Irene spins north, a lone figure stands in the surf of the Chesapeake Bay near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge tunnel.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Vicki Cronis-Nohe / The Virginian-Pilot

One of two people rescued from a sailboat, right, uses a line to get to the beach at Willoughby Spit after the boat foundered in the waters of Chesapeake Bay. A rescuer, left, waits for the second person to exit the boat.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bill Tiernan / The Virginian-Pilot

Workers board up windows at a Sprint store in the Flatiron building ahead of Hurricane Irene. The New York area is bracing for Hurricane Irene to hit late Saturday night and into Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: ANDREW GOMBERT / EPA

Donessa Arapi, who lives in the Colonial Place neighborhood, looks at the flood waters from the Lafayette River. She was walking through a light rain before the heavy rains and wind began later in the morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bill Tiernan / The Virginian-Pilot

Defying mandatory evacuation orders and a curfew, summer residents Pam Cooke, left, and Jody Bowers share a laugh as strong winds puff up Bowers's jacket on the Outer Banks as Hurricane Irene reaches the North Carolina coast.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Charles Dharapak / Associated Press

A surfer walks into the water ahead of Hurricane Irene's arrival. Mayor Michael Bloomberg sternly warned New Yorkers to follow the city's unprecedented mandatory evacuation orders, saying the approaching hurricane is "life-threatening" and "not a joke." Some 370,000 of the city's more than 8 million residents are under orders to leave their homes in low-lying and waterfront areas, largely in the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens and in the financial district in downtown Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MIKE SEGAR / REUTERS

Julissa Fugeuroa, left, and Arianna Guzman, right, hug friends as they evacuate from the Jacob Riis Houses, located in a mandatory evacuation zone in Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mario Tama / Getty Images

Residents of Far Rockaway crowd onto a bus as they evacuate the area ahead of Hurricane Irene. Some 370,000 of the city's more than 8 million residents are under orders to leave their homes in low-lying and waterfront areas, largely in the boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens and in the financial district in downtown Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MIKE SEGAR / REUTERS

Greg Richardson gives his son Zayon, 1 month old, a kiss while his wife Sherrelle Jones looks on at the Wicomico Youth and Civic Center.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Matthew S. Gunby / The Salisbury Daily Times

Rhiannon Shaw, 9, tries to stay warm while checking out the beach with friends as Hurricane Irene passes through. Irene howled ashore in North Carolina with heavy winds, rain and surf on Saturday on a path threatening the densely populated East Coast with flooding and power outages.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: RANDALL HILL / Reuters

Residents fill sandbags at the beach at 128th Street in the Rockaways in preparation for hurricane Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Customers line up outside a store in Times Square. Mayor Michael Bloomberg sternly warned New Yorkers to follow the city's unprecedented mandatory evacuation orders.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: BRENDAN MCDERMID / REUTERS

A clothing store holds a hurricane fashion sale.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: STEPHEN CHERNIN / AFP/Getty Images

With the Manhattan Bridge and the lower Manhattan skyline in the background, a U-Haul truck makes its way north on FDR Drive in the torrential rain. Hurricane Irene opened its assault on the Eastern Seaboard on Saturday by lashing the North Carolina coast with winds as strong as 115 mph and pounding shoreline homes with waves. Farther north, Philadelphia and New York City-area authorities readied a massive shutdown of trains and airports, with 2 million people ordered out of the way.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mary Altaffer / Associated Press

Abandoned beachfront houses are surrounded by rising water as the effects of Hurricane Irene are felt.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gerry Broome / Associated Press

Jay Burke of Somerset, Mass., and his stepson Morgan Reitzas Oak Bluffs, Mass., remove a boat from Lagoon Pond in anticipation of the arrival of Hurricane Irene on the island of Martha's Vineyard.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Steven Senne / Associated Press

People walk through the blowing rain and sand amid Hurricane Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gerry Broome / Associated Press

Residents walk along the beach in the Willoughby Spit area as Hurricane Irene hits.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Steve Helber / Associated Press

Waters lap at the foundation of a house along Calico Creek.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Travis Long / NEWS & OBSERVER

Chikh Lo, a West African, stands on a street corner selling umbrellas in preparation for Hurricane Irene.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chelsea Matiash / Associated Press

Deborah Lewis of comes out of her home to check minor flooding.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Travis Long / NEWS & OBSERVER

Jackie Sparnackel abandons her van and belongings near the Frisco Pier after driving up to see how the storm-battered structure was doing Saturday. Friends tried to tow her out but she was caught in an overwash. Hurricane force winds from Irene were battering the island where power has been knocked out.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chuck Liddy / The News and Observer

A vehicle avoids a downed utility pole in Greenville, N.C.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chris Seward / The News and Observer

Visitors play in the wind as Hurricane Irene passes through Virginia Beach, Va., Saturday. Federal officials are warning residents in Irene's path not to underestimate the storm after it was downgraded to a Category 1 hurricane as it made landfall Saturday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Steve Helber / Associated Press

Ann and Ted Odell look outside their front door during a break in the storm Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Travis Long / The News & Observer

A row of beachfront houses, some condemned before the arrival of Hurricane Irene, get lashed by wind, rain and the rising ocean.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA

Two people were rescued from a sailboat after high seas from Hurricane Irene caused it to founder, at 9th View in Willoughby in Norfolk, Va., Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Preston Gannaway / The Virginian-Pilot

East Hampton Beach lifeguard Bob Barber places warning tape on a public beach as Hurricane Irene approaches Long Island in East Hampton Village, N.Y. .

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Lucas Jackson / Reuters

The sun breaks through as surfers hit the ocean Saturday morning off of Pawleys Island, S.C., after Hurricane Irene moved through the area and traveled north along the eastern Atlantic coast.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Steve Jessmore / The Sun-News

President Obama gets an update on the status of Hurricane Irene at the Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Washington Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press

This National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite image, taken and released on August 26, 2011, shows Hurricane Irene approaching the Outer Banks of North Carolina as it tracks northward along the U.S. Eastern coastline. The United States urged 55 million people on its eastern seaboard to prepare for Hurricane Irene as the powerful storm packing high winds and heavy rain bore down on the North Carolina coast. REUTERS/NOAA/Handout (ENVIRONMENT SCI TECH IMAGES OF THE DAY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS

PHOTOGRAPH BY: HO / NOAA

A surfer in Jacksonville Beach, Florida, tries to position himself to ride between the pillars of a pier as Hurricane Irene moves up the eastern coast, Friday, Aug. 26, 2011.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jon M. Fletcher / The Florida Times-Union

As Hurricane Irene moved north off the coast of South Carolina, an experienced surfer takes a leap into the turbulent waters off the Isle of Palms, S.C. on Friday August 26, 2011. (AP Photo/The Post And Courier, Wade Spees)

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Wade Spees / The Post And Courier

Boaters brave the waves and wind caused by Hurricane Irene at the Morris Island light house, Friday, Aug. 26, 2011 in Folly Beach, S.C.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Sarah Bates / The Post And Courier

Pedestrians walk past sandbags used to control possible floods at downtown Manhattan in New York, August 26, 2011. New York on Friday ordered residents in low-lying areas to evacuate before the onslaught this weekend of massive Hurricane Irene, which churned northward along the East Coast.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Eduardo Munoz / Reuters

The Statue of Liberty stands with a view of downtown skyline on Friday, Aug. 26, 2011 in New York. Mayor Michael Bloomberg of New York City orders the mandatory evacuation of around 250,000 residents in Manhattan for preparation of Hurricane Irene. (AP Photo/Jin Lee)

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jin Lee / Associated Press

A shopper passes by empty shelves while looking for bottled water at a Stop and Shop at Rockaway Beach in New York, August 26, 2011. As North Carolina braced on Friday for a direct hit from Hurricane Irene, cities along the East Coast were on alert and millions of beach goers cut short vacations to escape the powerful storm. With more than 50 million people potentially in Irene's path, residents stocked up on food and water and worked to secure homes, vehicles and boats. States, cities, ports, oil refineries and nuclear plants scrambled to activate emergency plans. REUTERS/Allison Joyce (UNITED STATES - Tags: DISASTER ENVIRONMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY)

PHOTOGRAPH BY: ALLISON JOYCE / Reuters

OCEAN CITY, MD - AUGUST 26: Outdoor furniture sits in a pool at the Hilton hotel keep it from blowing away in preparation for Hurricane Irene on August 26, 2011 in Ocean City, Maryland. Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan has ordered a mandatory evacuation for thousands of residents and visitors to leave the ocean front community and Maryland's Governor O'Malley has declared a state of emergency as Hurricane Irene moves up the eastern seaboard. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mark Wilson / Getty Images North America

Brandon Shirley, of Atlantic Beach, sits on his porch, Friday, August 26, 2011 as rain bands start to move through Atlantic Beach, North Carolina. Hurricane Irene is expected to make landfall on the North Carolina coast on Saturday. (Travis Long/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT)

PHOTOGRAPH BY: TRAVIS LONG / Raleigh News & Observer

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Hurricane Irene cleanup begins on battered East Coast

Hurricane Irene and its remnants have mostly moved on, but its effects will be felt for a long time on the East Coast.

Irene has claimed at least 42 lives in 12 states. There is widespread flooding throughout the Northeast, both along the coast and inland, and millions of people are without power. Rescuers are focusing on rural regions, particularly Vermont, where flooding has isolated several communities.

Authorities continue to warn residents to stay inside to avoid falling trees, downed power lines and fast-rising water.

26 Comments

  1. August 27, 2011, 4:38 pm

    This is definitely a cute pic.

    By: anabel
  2. August 27, 2011, 4:40 pm

    Now this is scarey

    By: anabel
  3. August 27, 2011, 4:42 pm

    Mother-nature sure is powerful

    By: anabel
  4. August 27, 2011, 4:43 pm

    Craaaaaaazyyyyyy!!!!!!!

    By: anabel
  5. August 27, 2011, 7:04 pm

    Having vacationed in South Nags Head, NC on this very street (where this photo was taken) I can tell you that Hurricane Irene is not responsible for the damage to the houses sitting in the ocean (to the left of the berm). They have been condemned and empty for several years prior to Irene.

    By: ~kim
  6. August 27, 2011, 7:54 pm

    clueless

    By: Leslie Ann Clark
  7. August 27, 2011, 8:12 pm

    wher is this photo

    By: hahanknk
  8. August 27, 2011, 8:58 pm

    Ocean City, MD. Read the caption.

    By: rsmith151@yahoo.com
  9. August 27, 2011, 9:24 pm

    Com'n I am ready for ya !__akm

    By: akm2410
  10. August 28, 2011, 3:41 am

    I'm sure the tape will save the window. NYC will survive!!!!

    By: nearlynormalized
  11. August 28, 2011, 6:47 am

    God help U.S and people over dare

    By: Daniel
  12. August 28, 2011, 8:25 am

    Go NAVY!

    By: fred
  13. August 28, 2011, 9:58 am

    aww thats my cousin Irene surviving hurrican Irene!!! lol <3 my family!!!

    By: mimi
  14. August 28, 2011, 10:51 am

    Damn, I like this kind of hurricane doom :)

    By: deadpammy
  15. August 28, 2011, 2:33 pm

    So remember, despite all our displays of Pomp and Circumstance, we face disaster at the whim of Mme Nature.

    By: kathycheer@ymail.com
  16. August 28, 2011, 5:24 pm

    They put the tape on the windows to prevent them from blowing glass everywhere when they shatter, not to try and save the window.

    By: sbsadfsadfsadf
  17. August 29, 2011, 12:00 am

    who could have guess if you make houses right on the beach, right on the sand with only the ocean infront of you, that water could come and wipe the smile off your face?

    By: john doe
  18. August 29, 2011, 9:49 am

    a golden state warriors fan on the east coast?

    By: sasasam
  19. August 29, 2011, 10:51 am

    This could be called 'Unintentional Suicide'. Hope this guy fled soon after!

    By: yonggi61
  20. August 29, 2011, 10:52 am

    So that's where the Sta-Puff Marshmallow Man went! Great pic, hope they're safe.

    By: yonggi61
  21. August 29, 2011, 11:18 am

    There are some excellent photographs in this collection. Congratulations.

    By: joelburger64
  22. August 29, 2011, 1:40 pm

    Clever comment Dan…being Dare County and all. The house with the tower is Green Lantern light…I stayed there a few years ago. Pray for folks and for my next year vacation…was there about a month ago….and was trying to talk my wife into going there the weekend of storm cause we were at Norfolk Naval Base on business.

    Brian Muldoon…Wash DC

    By: bdoon51@gmail.com
  23. August 29, 2011, 1:41 pm

    Hey John

    We all subsidize the flood insurance they have from the Federal Gov…we all pay for the repairs or replacement.

    bdoon51@gmail.com

    By: bdoobdn51@gmail.com
  24. August 29, 2011, 1:43 pm

    Looks like Hateras Island, NC

    bdoon51@gmail.com

    By: bdoobdn51@gmail.com
  25. August 29, 2011, 2:07 pm

    They put tape on the windows because they THINK tape will do anything. It won't.

    By: getaclue
  26. August 29, 2011, 3:15 pm

    IM sorry to say this, but those people whose lives were lost could of been prevented if they had listened to the damn police when they were told to evacuate!!!!!

    By: Anna banannanana

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