Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

French aviator Louis Paulhan makes a record-breaking flight to 4,600 feet at the Los Angeles Air Meet in Dominguez Hills in 1910. The balloon in the background advertised the young Los Angeles Examiner, a Hearst paper that, along with the Los Angeles Times, helped sponsor the meet. Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens / Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Lyman Gilmore Jr. and his brother Charles are seen in their barn in Grass Valley, Calif., in 1907. Although this steam-powered, eight-passenger plane never flew, they represented early aviation enthusiasts drawn to the imaginative possibilities of flight. Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Philip Parmalee, part of the Wright Brothers exhibition team, ascends over Dominguez Field early in 1912. He died in a plane crash later that year.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens / Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Two female flying enthusiasts are seen in 1915. Although early aviation carried a strong masculine bent, flying attracted women as well as men. Female pilots were soon matching skills with men, barnstorming in exhibitions, setting speed and altitude records, and stunt-flying for movies. Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens / Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Wiley Post, Bill Parker, Carl Squier and Dick von Hake are seen with the Lockheed Vega fuselage in 1929. Post, a famous one-eyed pilot, flew his Vega Winnie Mae on two record-breaking round-the-world flights.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens / Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Wiley Post, Bill Parker and Capt. Balderston, from left, confer with an unidentified pilot wearing a sub-stratosphere suit in 1935. Post used the suit to fly to an unofficial record of 55,000 feet. On a later flight, after a forced landing, the alien-looking pressure suit alarmed local residents. Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

A static load test of the Lockheed Vega wing in 1929. During one such test, as the crew added sandbags to the load, Lockheed executive Carl Squier snuck in and snapped a piece of wood behind his back. The engineers all jumped, thinking the entire wing had given way. Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens / Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

A flight attendant serves tea on a Transcontinental Air Transport flight in 1929. Passenger flight catered to the wealthy during the Roaring '20s. Transcontinental Air Transport specialized in first-class service; a one-way cross-country ticket cost $350. Ten days after this photo was taken. the stock market crashed and the Great Depression replaced scenes of luxury with hardship. The airline was bankrupt within a year. Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens / Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Amelia Earhart takes a break on the Lockheed factory floor in the early 1930s. Earhart presented a glamorous public image but knew her way around an airplane and an aircraft plant. She was a frequent visitor to Lockheed to keep tabs on the construction of her newest airplanes. Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens / Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

A woman welds exhaust manifolds for airplane engines at Solar Air in 1943. By 1944, women made up more than 40% of the aircraft production workforce in Los Angeles. Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens / Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

A Lockheed Constitution is under construction in 1946. The scale of some planes matched the scope of the industry's mobilization. The Constitution's tail towered 50 feet, requiring a special hangar. Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens / Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

Test pilot "Cowboy" Joe Walker is seen in 1955 with the Bell X-1A rocket plane at the NASA High-Speed Flight Station at Edwards Air Force Base. Test pilots at Edwards were modern-day cowboys on the high-desert frontier, cultivating a culture of individuality and courage. Credit: NASA

PHOTOGRAPH BY: NASA / NASA

NASA pilot Bill Dana watches a Boeing NB-52B carrier aircraft fly overhead in 1969 after a successful test flight of the Northrop HL-10 lifting body at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Fellow pilot John Reeves can be seen at the cockpit of the lifting body. Credit: NASA

PHOTOGRAPH BY: NASA / NASA

SR-71 Blackbirds are seen on the production line at Lockheed Skunk Works in the mid-1960s The scale of some planes matched the scope of the industry's mobilization. A sign on the wall warns "Watch out for F.O.D." A loose bolt or rivet that could be sucked into a jet engine was potential "foreign object damage," costing millions of dollars to repair. Credit: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens / Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens

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100 years of Southland aviation history

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100 years of Southland aviation history

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100 years of Southland aviation history

new exhibit at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens will showcase the aerospace industry’s impact on Southern California over the last 100 years.

“Blue Sky Metropolis: The Aerospace Century in Southern California” recounts that transformative era through approximately 50 manuscripts, documents and photographs drawn from the Huntington’s growing collection of aerospace-related materials and other private and public collections. The exhibit will be on view in the library’s West Hall from Oct. 8 to Jan. 9.

Read W.J. Hennigan’s story

3 Comments

  1. October 8, 2011, 6:03 pm

    Just to imagine all the early traffic to come in an out of The Santa Monica Airport.

    By: harri@maki.as
  2. October 10, 2011, 1:03 pm

    […] a sneak peek, take a look at the photo gallery here and in the the video […]

  3. October 10, 2011, 8:04 pm

    […] a sneak peek, take a look at the photo gallery here and in the the video […]

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