Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Protesters were ejected from the CSU board of trustees meeting as they shouted down the trustees. Once outside, they confronted University Police and broke a glass door while demanding to be allowed inside again.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

A protester being taken into custody falls inside the CSU building as campus police try to close a glass door to keep other protesters out.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

Protesters were ejected from the CSU board of trustees meeting and broke a glass door while demanding to be allowed inside again.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

Protesters confront University Police demanding to be allowed inside again after they were removed for disrupting the meeting.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

Protesters were ejected from the CSU board of trustees meeting as they shouted down the trustees.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

The California State University board of trustees voted narrowly to increase annual tuition by 9%, or $500, for next fall. With the increase, annual tuition for undergraduates will rise to just under $6,000.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

Toni Kukreja , left, of the CSUEU union participates in reading an indictment of the banks and CSU system before protesters were ejected from the CSU board of trustees meeting.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

More galleries on Framework

return to gallery

Violent disruptions at CSU trustee meeting

Pictures in the News | August 11, 2014

Monday's Pictures in the News begins in Spain's Canary Islands, where a supermoon is captured from the Astrophysical Institute of the Canaries. The supermoon was said to be the...   View Post»

   

Times photographer documents the deadly conflict between Israel and Hamas

Times photographer documents conflict in Gaza Strip

A United Nations school crammed with people displaced by Israel's war with Palestinian militants was hit in shelling in the Gaza Strip early Wednesday, killing at least 16...   View Post»

   

Violent disruptions at CSU trustee meeting

Pictures in the News | March 12, 2014

Wednesday's Pictures in the News begins in New York, where firefighters were battling a five-alarm blaze caused by a suspected explosion at a building in East Harlem. Austin,...   View Post»

   

Violent disruptions at CSU trustee meeting

Pictures in the News | July 19, 2013

Friday's Pictures in the News begins in the San Jacinto mountains , where firefighters are battling the  22,800 acre Mountain fire.   View Post»

   

Violent disruptions at CSU trustee meeting

The 405: A repeating history of construction [updated]

This weekend's 405 Freeway construction project, being called "Carmageddon 2," is nothing new.   View Post»

   

Violent disruptions at CSU trustee meeting

Pictures in the News | April 26, 2011

Today's Pictures in the News includes injured British photojournalist Guy Martin arriving in Malta from Misrata, Libya. He was wounded in the same attack that killed British...   View Post»

   

Faces of Coachella 2011

Faces of Coachella 2011

As tens of thousands of music lovers descended on the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival this weekend, Los Angeles Times photographer Brian van der Brug roamed the vast...   View Post»

   

Violent disruptions at CSU trustee meeting

Pictures in the News | March 2, 2011

Embattled Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi leads Wednesday's Pictures in the News as he waves to the crowd before a speech in Tripoli. Kadafi blamed Al Qaeda for creating turmoil...   View Post»

   

Violent disruptions at CSU trustee meeting

Pictures in the News | Dec. 28, 2010

We begin today's Pictures in the News on a somber note with the remains of a U.S. Marine killed in action in Afghanistan returning home. In Israel, an apparent accident sets...   View Post»

   

Violent disruptions at CSU trustee meeting

Pictures in the News | Dec. 27, 2010

Today marks the anniversary of the assassination of Pakistan's former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto in 2007 after her return to the country from a self-imposed exile. We begin...   View Post»

Violent disruptions at CSU trustee meeting

By Carla Rivera:
At a meeting in Long Beach marked by violent disruptions, the California State University board of trustees on Wednesday voted narrowly to increase annual tuition by 9%, or $500, for next fall. With the increase, annual tuition for undergraduates will rise to just under $6,000.

The 9-to-6 vote was taken behind closed doors and out of public view after police removed chanting, whistle-blowing protesters from the meeting room. Several protesters were taken into custody after a group tried to storm the meeting room, shattering a glass door.

The vote comes as students, faculty and labor groups have intensified pressure on University of California and Cal State leaders to oppose further fee hikes and education cuts.

Students and members of the group ReFund California tried to storm the front door and police released tear gas to push them back. Several protesters were handcuffed and arrested.

8 Comments

  1. November 17, 2011, 12:55 am

    Does that look like resisting arrest?

    By: Andrew
  2. November 17, 2011, 4:39 pm

    I was at the protests and am picture in several of the above photos. The article and caption are blatantly false: protestors were situated well away from the doors of the building when the glass shattered. University police had slammed them shut and were attempting to affix a chain to the doors when one of them stuck the glass with a metal police baton, shattering it from the inside. Note that in photo #3, above, the majority of shards fell out side of the building, indicating the glass was broken from the inside. Channel 34 News (Spanish-language) also reported and showed video footage of police breaking the glass after protestors had backed away, and there are additional photos and videos on Occupy Long Beach's Facebook page.

    By: Raphael Leib
  3. November 18, 2011, 4:06 pm

    The picture sure seems to contradict what you say especially when you can seen the people pushing on the glass and caused it to break. Believe what you want to believe.

    By: klanning3@msn.com
  4. November 18, 2011, 4:09 pm

    No one was being arrested.

    By: klanning3@msn.com
  5. November 18, 2011, 7:31 pm

    Raphael, YOU LIE!!! I saw videos and you mobsters broke the glass. You should be ashamed of yourself!

    By: Rose
  6. November 18, 2011, 7:32 pm

    Anyone who wants to live in a socialist country, should MOVE TO ONE!!

    By: Rose
  7. November 22, 2011, 9:08 am

    The videos show the officers trying to close the door and the students/demonstrators pulling on the doors. The idea is that people have the right to protest and speak but the message is lost when people want to egt out of control and lose focus. I too think that students pay to much and the Admin should take a pay cut. The Chancellor could cut his pay and help the students as well. What happens with the media and some protestors is that they feel the need to destroy which hurts their cause.

    By: klanning3@msn.com
  8. December 3, 2011, 5:15 pm

    Whoever is responsible for breaking the doors, the worst part of this to me is that the trustees voted WITHOUT the presence of the student trustee, and behind closed doors. If they don't want to take action in public view, they shouldn't take action. Tuition has risen by more than 100% in the past ten years. My daughter now pays more in one semester than someone would have paid for the entire year ten years ago – more than I paid for my entire college education (including a master's from UC Berkeley!) in the 70's and 80's. And although our family was told that our "expected family contribution" for her expenses would be $5000 less than the cost of attendance, she still didn't qualify for financial aid to cover that gap. College is an investment in our future as a state, but we're not making that investment – we'd rather pay to incarcerate than to educate our youth.

    By: catic15@gmail.com

Add a comment or a question.

If you are under 13 years of age you may read this message board, but you may not participate. Here are the full legal terms you agree to by using this comment form.

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until they've been approved.

Required

Required, will not be published