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Members of the British Antarctic Expedition, also known as Terra Nova, at the "Ice Cave." Laying bare their dejection and determination, the story of Robert Scott's bid to become the first to reach the South Pole is being told by the men themselves, 100 years after the ill-fated expedition.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: HERBERT PONTING / AFP / Getty Images

British Antarctic Expedition photo taken between 1910-13, of Terra Nova leader Capt. Robert Scott sitting at a desk.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: HERBERT PONTING / AFP / Getty Images

Dec. 20, 1910, photograph of geologist Frank Debenham and Thomas Taylor, members of the British Antarctic Expedition, skiing in front of an iceberg.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: HERBERT PONTING / AFP / Getty Images

January 1912 photograph of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, left, with members of the British Antarctic Expedition at the South Pole next the tent of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, who beat Scott to the Pole by 33 days.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: LIEUTENANT HENRY BOWERS / AFP / Getty Images

A photograph taken in 1910 or 1911 shows the Terra Nova, the ship used by the British Antarctic Expedition at anchor next to the pack ice in Antarctica.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: HERBERT PONTING / AFP / Getty Images

January 1912 photograph of (standing L-R) Capt. Lawrence Oates, Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Petty Officer Edgar Evans, (seated (L-R) Lt. Henry Bowers and Edward Wilson of the British Antarctic Expedition, posing at the South Pole in front of flags -- including the Norwegian flag planted by a team led by explorer Roald Amundsen, who beat Scott to the Pole by 33 days.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: LIEUTENANT HENRY BOWERS / AFP / Getty Images

A Dec. 9, 1910, photograph shows members of the British Antarctic Expedition, on the forecastle of the Terra Nova, as they enter the Antarctic ice pack.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: HERBERT PONTING / AFP / Getty Images

An August 1, 1911, photograph shows expedition members Lt. Henry Robertson Bowers, center, Edward Wilson, left, and Apsley Cherry-Garrard taking refreshment after returning from their winter journey to Cape Crozierat during the British Antarctic Expedition.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: HERBERT PONTING / AFP / Getty Images

A Jan. 7, 1911, photograph shows penguins on the ice opposite an iceberg as seen by members of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910-13, or the Terra Nova expedition, in Antarctica.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: HERBERT PONTING / AFP / Getty Images

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Freeze Frame: The story of the Terra Nova expedition

The story of the Terra Nova expedition, explored through the letters, diaries and photographs of its members, is to be told during a once-in-a-lifetime exhibition at Cambridge University’s Polar Museum entitled, “These Rough Notes: Captain Scott’s Last Expedition.”

The exhibition tells the full story of the fateful Terra Nova expedition, not just through the famous journals and letters of Scott, Bowers, Evans, Oates and Wilson, who perished on their way back from the Pole, but through other members of the ship’s crew and shore party.

Scott Polar Research Institute: The story of the Terra Nova expedition

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