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Super Bowl halftime Bell Rocket Air Men

Super Bowl halftime Bell Rocket Air Men

Jan. 15, 1967:  The Bell Rocket Air Men soar above the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum during Super Bowl halftime show entitled “Super Sights and Sounds.”

On that first Super Bowl morning, a short Los Angeles Times article reported on the upcoming halftime show:

Under the direction of Tommy Walker, the pageantry includes such attractions as the Grambling College Tiger Band from Louisiana, the 193-piece University of Arizona Band, the Bell Rocket Air Men, a 200 voice chorus, 300 pigeons and 10,000 balloons.

Walker was USC band director and Disneyland pageant director before forming his own production company three months ago.

The Rocket Belt demonstration lasted only about 20 seconds. The early Bell Rocket Belts only carried enough hydrogen peroxide propellant to soar up to 100 feet and travel 300 yards, but it was enough to attract the attention of Times photographers Ben Olender and Art Rogers. Each of them took 2-3 images of the flight demonstration.  These photos were found in the unpublished negative files from the original Super Bowl.

Jan. 15, 1967:  The Bell Rocket Air Men demonstration team hover near marching band during halftime show of first Super Bowl game at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Credit: Art Rogers/Los Angeles Times

scott.harrison@latimes.com

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3 Comments

  1. February 2, 2012, 10:32 am

    Yeah… Bill Suitor and Bob Courter

    By: pgijs@onsnet.nu
  2. February 2, 2012, 1:47 pm

    that is awesome!!!

    By: nick
  3. January 26, 2015, 11:25 am

    had a chance to meet Bill and work with him briefly. Fascinating guy. Wrote about his experiences doing everything from Lost In Space to James Bond to Disneyland. The guy who built the private version that was seen in the 1984 Olympics was Nelson Tyler. He developed the leading helicopter camera rig in the film industry and the forerunner to the Sea-Doo – the Wetbike (also seen in a Bond film).
    All great guys from a great era of analog inventiveness where everything seemed possible!

    By: thecyclist

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