Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

The rock sits in the Stone Valley Quarry last year.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

Michael Govan, director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, takes a look at the rock.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

The 340-ton rock is one of the heaviest objects to be moved since ancient times, Govan said. "It's much contested, the movement of monoliths in ancient times. The estimated weights of certain objects are speculation. But it is pretty clear that this is one of the largest monoliths that's ever been moved," he said.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

A crew builds a steel transporter around the granite rock.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Russel McFann welds a link to a crossbeam as he helps construct the custom transporter.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

The transporter is nearly as wide as three freeway lanes.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

A photographer lies on the ground for a low-angle shot as the 340-ton boulder begins its journey in a custom-made transporter that is 200 feet long and has 176 wheels.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

The boulder descends Granite Hill Road toward its first overnight stop in Glen Avon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

Spectators snap last-minute photos before the granite boulder begins its journey.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

The hairpin turn from Granite Hill Drive onto Country Village Road provided the only real drama of the night, taking well over an hour. “We learned a few things there about steering the back wheels,” said project manager Mark Albrecht.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

Vehicles' taillights appears as red streaks in a long-exposure image of spectators gathered to watch the boulder creep down the road.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

Workers move in to make adjustments after the boulder reached its first-night stopping point in Glen Avon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

Spectators record the rock's passing.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

Anna Magallanez, 34, and her two children Andrew, 5, and Alyssa, 11, stop by to look at 340-ton boulder during its first stop in Glen Avon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

Mark Albrecht of Emmert International, the company responsible for moving the 340-ton boulder, checks it out on its first stop in Glen Avon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times

A 340-ton granite boulder is transported by trailer along Pacific Coast Highway into Wilmington on Thursday morning, the eighth day of its journey to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Engineers and linemen confer in the Bixby Knolls neighborhood before the eighth leg of the boulder's journey from Riverside County to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in Los Angeles' Mid-Wilshire district.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Spectators watch as the nearly two-story-high granite boulder is transported down Atlantic Avenue. The boulder will become the focal point of artist Michael Heizer's sculpture "Levitated Mass."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

An engineer tightens the chains holding a 340-ton granite boulder as it moves along Ocean Boulevard early Thursday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

The boulder traveled through Long Beach and Wilmington and eventually ended in Carson on Thursday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Participants in a block party for the LACMA rock dance on the sidewalk in the Long Beach neighborhood of Bixby Knolls, where the rock paused on Wednesday, on its journey from a quarry in the inland empire to the museum in Los Angeles.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Long Beach residents gather on the sidewalk on Atlantic Avenue in Long Beach, where the LACMA boulder paused Wednesday on its journey from a quarry in the Inland Empire to the museum in Los Angeles.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Long Beach residents gather on the sidewalk on Atlantic Avenue in Long Beach where the LACMA boulder paused Wednesday on its journey from a quarry in the Inland Empire to the museum in Los Angeles.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Engineers stay close as the 340-ton rock travels through rural Glen Avon at 5 mph on Night 2 of its 105-mile journey after an overnight stop. It will travel through 22 Southland cities before finally reaching its destination after an 11-day trek on a 294-foot-long truck.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

Spectators gather to get a close-up view of the rock late Wednesday evening.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

Engineers stay close to the 340-ton rock as it travels through rural Glen Avon at 5 mph on Night 2 of its 105-mile journey.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

People swarm and celebrate the massive plastic shrink-wrapped LACMA rock as it arrives at the museum after the nearly 105-mile, 11-day, serpentine journey from Riverside County.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Crowds line the streets as the plastic shrink-wrapped rock makes its way near Adams Boulevard and Western Avenue in L.A. en route to LACMA. The 11-day trip ended Saturday as the boulder traveled along Wilshire Boulevard to the museum.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Onlookers snap shots of the 340-ton boulder as it makes its way to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

A crowd gathers at Adams Boulevard and Western Avenue as the rock destined for an art installation titled "Levitated Mass" makes its way to LACMA.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

People along Adams Boulevard near USC capture the rock's progress with their cameras.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

People view the LACMA rock from all angles as it makes a temporary stop on Western Avenue.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

People line Wilshire Boulevard with cameras as the 340-ton rock arrives at LACMA, passing in front of the Chris Burden's "Urban Light" sculpture at 4:25 a.m. Saturday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

People swarm the rock as it arrives at LACMA.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

The LACMA rock comes to a stop on Wilshire Boulevard in front of the museum.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times

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Giant rock arrives at LACMA

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Giant rock arrives at LACMA

After a nearly two-week journey, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s newest acquisition — a 340-ton boulder that has already garnered international attention — and its massive transporter arrived at the Wilshire Boulevard site at 4:25 a.m. Saturday.

Hundreds of people, armed with cellphone cameras and noisemakers, turned out to welcome the big rock, the centerpiece of the museum’s new outdoor installation called “Levitated Mass.” The rock made its way from a Riverside County quarry 105 miles away, drawing big crowds in communities along its route.

No sooner had the boulder’s 176-wheel transporter truck stopped in front of LACMA’s main entrance than its power generator went out, resulting in a final 30-minute delay and an opportunity for hundreds of onlookers to surge forward.

Some people crowded around the big rock and posed for snapshots.

9 Comments

  1. March 1, 2012, 3:38 pm

    KK is awesome

    By: heavyhauler69
  2. March 1, 2012, 3:39 pm

    K.K. is awesome but not Harry.

    By: heavyhauler69
  3. March 4, 2012, 2:41 pm

    I was with my family and we saw it in the truck! We waited 20 minutes in traffic for it but it was worth it! When we got close to it I felt as small as an ant!

    By: tengu
  4. March 6, 2012, 11:53 pm

    The Rock just passes by my home on Paramount in Lakewood. It was reaaly something to see. Huge and interesting!

    By: Gailya of lakewood
  5. March 9, 2012, 11:49 am

    Apparently folks in some big California Cities never seen a small boulder before.

    You all really got to get out more often. I got a bigger rock than that siting under my house. Had to cut a small part of it away to set the foundation.

    We call our foundation rock Wilber…

    What?

    Hey look.. unlike your rock which is just gonna lay around and look pretty our rock has a real job.

    Vic

    By: Vic
  6. March 9, 2012, 8:54 pm

    Chez, KK, Harry & Rick You guys did. A good job.

    Best Emmert Crew!!! Cheers to you guys!!

    By: Joy
  7. March 11, 2012, 10:47 pm

    why is this considered art?

    By: caca@yahoo.com
  8. March 11, 2012, 11:35 pm

    Hey kids, want to go see a boulder that just arrived at a museum? Ummm, can we climb on it dad? No. Can we throw the tennis ball at it? No. What can we do there dad? You can look at it with amazement. You mean like the way I looked in amazement at the paintings and sculptures at museums in Europe over the summer? Yeah, just like that. Ummm, but we drive by boulders everyday on our way to school….and those we can climb on and study the interesting features hands on. Come on kids, just pretend it is an amazing art piece more worthy than any other art piece you have ever seen and one day you'll be able to tell your grandchildren about how you got to see the LACMA boulder in person the day it arrived. Ummm, but dad, transporting an object made by nature just isn't so impressive, sorry. Nature rocks (no pun intended), but we humans should not try to take artistic credit where it isn't deserved. Have fun dad.

    By: lumdio@yahoo.com
  9. March 20, 2012, 4:16 pm

    The rock was quarried in the City of Jurupa Valley; it is not from "Riverside" as mentioned in the captions, except that Jurupa Valley is in the County of Riverside. This would be like saying something is from Los Angeles when its origin is Pasadena or Manhattan Beach.

    By: KarenB

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