Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

June 09, 2012: The battleship Iowa emerges from the shadow of the Vincent Thomas Bridge on Saturday afternoon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

June 09, 2012: A floatilla of ships, yachts and sailboats accompanied the battleship Iowa as it made its way in Los Angeles Harbor on Saturday afternoon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

June 09, 2012: Sea cadets are instructed where and how to "man the rails," prior to the Iowa's turnaround in the harbor.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

June 09, 2012: Tugboats position themselves alongside the Iowa on Saturday afternoon to move it through the harbor to its new berth, where it will open next month as a waterfront museum.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

June 09, 2012: The Iowa was moved, with great fanfare, into its permanent home at Berth 87 in Los Angeles Harbor. Sea cadets and a color guard prepare for the storied battleship's short journey through the harbor.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

June 2, 2012: Members of the Cabrillo Beach Boosters wave as the battleship Iowa enters through Angels Gate into Los Angeles Harbor, en route to temporary docking at Berths 51-52. The battleship will be moved on June 9 to its permanent location at Berth 87 in San Pedro.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

The 69-year-old battleship Iowa and her ocean tug, the Warrior, arrive off the Southern California coast after a four-day tow from San Francisco Bay.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

A Coast Guard boat approaches the famed battleship Iowa as it arrives off the Southern California coast from San Francisco Bay.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

The battleship Iowa passes beneath the Golden Gate Bridge on May 26, 2012.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

MAY 26, 2012: Members of the Pacific Battleship Center join in releasing the ropes from the Iowa at its temporary berth in Richmond. It's about to begin its final voyage to Southern California and its permanent home as a floating museum on the San Pedro waterfront.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

At 3:03 p.m. on May 26, 2012, the 69-year-old battleship Iowa is towed just beyond the Golden Gate Bridge and moves out into the ocean on its final voyage to Southern California and its permanent home as a floating museum on the San Pedro waterfront.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Pedestrians crowd the Golden Gate Bridge to watch the 69-year-old battleship Iowa as it leaves San Francisco Bay on May 26, 2012.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Stretching more than 800 feet in length, the battleship Iowa approaches the Golden Gate Bridge.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

The 69-year-old battleship Iowa is pulled through San Francisco Bay by the 7,200-horsepower oceangoing tug Warrior on May 26, 2012. Other tugs escort the 45,000-ton warship and recreation sailors pass by for a closer look.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Spectators watch the 69-year-old battleship Iowa as it is pulled through San Francisco Bay by the 7,200-horsepower oceangoing tug Warrior on May 26, 2012. Other tugs flank the 45,000-ton warship and recreation sailors pass by for a closer look. The Iowa is making its final voyage to its permanent home as a floating museum on the San Pedro waterfront.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

May 12, 2012: John Wolfinbarger, 88, stands aboard the Iowa and holds up a picture of how the ship looked when he served on it during World War II. He said it sometimes was so hot in the Pacific that he and other sailors chose to sleep on the deck.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

May 12, 2012: David Way watches a visitor step through the 18-inch-thick doorway of the battleship Iowa's conning station.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

May 12, 2012: David Way of the Pacific Battleship Center stands at the bell on the bow of the battleship Iowa. The Huntington Beach resident has been working to coordinate the ship's restoration and its conveyance to the Port of Los Angeles.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

May 12, 2012: Bay Area resident Karen Johnston views the Iowa from an overlook. The battleship carried President Franklin Delano Roosevelt across the Atlantic and had a bathtub -- a rare amenity in a U.S. warship -- installed specifically for him.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

May 12, 2012: The Iowa, which is among the biggest U.S. battleships ever built, will start its journey to Los Angeles by being towed under the Golden Gate Bridge and out of the San Francisco Bay.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

May 12, 2012: David Way of the Pacific Battleship Center gazes down at the Iowa’s deck. His group campaigned for the ship's permanent home to be in Los Angeles.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

May 11, 2012: A worker rolls a coat of "battleship gray" paint onto one of the big guns at the bow end of the Iowa. The ship served in World War II and the Korean War, and in the 1980s it was a formidable presence at NATO exercises and in the Persian Gulf.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

May 11, 2012: A fresh coat of paint glistens on one of the huge artillery guns at the bow end of the battleship Iowa. In the ship's heyday, its guns could hurl 2,700-pound shells at targets more than 24 miles away.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

May 12, 2012: Christopher Edwards, a volunteer docent, stands in the "combat engagement center" of the battleship Iowa. This room is where naval officers would command the firing of the ship's weaponry.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

The secondary conning station high on the bridge of the battleship Iowa is an armor-plated room with walls of thick steel. If the main bridge was damaged, the ship would be steered from here. The wheel that was once on the post below the taped-over dials is now in a maritime museum.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

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Battleship Iowa’s final journey

The battleship Iowa, a storied vessel that languished for years in the U.S. Navy’s mothball fleet, began its final journey Saturday, May 26, 2012, from San Francisco Bay to its permanent home as a museum in the Port of Los Angeles.

Four tugboats guided the Iowa under the Golden Gate Bridge at 3 p.m. and out of the bay. One of them, the 7,200-horsepower Warrior, will chug down the coast with the massive ship in tow, taking about four days to reach Southern California.

Read the full story by Times staff writer Steve Chawkins.

The battleship USS Iowa 1942-2012 photo gallery.

9 Comments

  1. May 14, 2012, 12:12 pm

    Let the Warrior keep chugging all the way to Israel.

    The Iowa should be destined to continue patrolling the Mediterranean Sea under an Israeli Flag,

    Eventually ending up as a Museum Ship in Nahariya, Israel.

    By: leonaks@gmail.com
  2. May 14, 2012, 1:40 pm

    The previous comment was a selfish idea from an Israeli lobbyist / Jew to steal the ship and deprive Americans who have their relatives memories attached to this ship. Israel did not build America nor fought in WWII for America. Try to feel for others and their emotions and may be then try to win the hearts of others. Al

    By: Rajput.us
  3. May 14, 2012, 9:35 pm

    I have a better idea. There is a great Youtube video of a Democracy Now news program from 2005 in which the esteemed reporter Seymour Hersh declares "a cult took over our government" and "eight or nine Neoconservatives" led us into the illegal, immoral and shameful war against Iraq. Since Mr. hersh is correct about that, the USS Iowa should be parked somewhere near New York City and provided a squadron of drones to fly around Manhattan searching for Neocons. Then, whenever one is sighted, the Iowa can hurl a few round of her classic 4000 lb. munitions. This… would be a real War on Terror, and it might partially ameliorate the cosmic bad karma brought upon us by each and every war-of-aggression fought in the mideast because some think-tank psychopath thinks it would be good for Israel.

    By: plinythewelder
  4. May 14, 2012, 9:38 pm

    Another reason it would be unacceptable for the Iowa to sail under an Israeli flag is the attack on the USS Liberty. Our support for Israel should have ceased on that day, and we should not have withheld a stern reaction. After all, that was at least the second attempted false-flag attack on US interests by Israel – the first being the Lavon Affair. The signs that 9/11 was another are too numerous to mention.

    By: plinythewelder
  5. May 14, 2012, 10:47 pm

    "Let the Warrior keep chugging to Israel ………." comment #1 was make by an American Vietnam Veteran

    and a former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard worker.

    The Iowa should be refurbished in Los Angeles Shipyard and on the East Coast providing jobs

    to American workers. It should then be chuggeg by the "Warrior" to Israel.

    The US Marines still have an unsettled account with the Hizzballah for bombing the Beirut barracks.

    That account will be settled be the Israeli Navy and the Iowa when and if the Hizzballah attacks again and

    Iran continues to show further Nuclear ambitions.

    By: leonaks@gmail.com
  6. May 14, 2012, 10:52 pm

    With all Honor and due respect to the memories and accomplishments of WW II Veterans and their families.

    The sea tug "Warrior" should continue chugging the Battleship Iowa to the Eastern Mediterranean.

    By: leonaks@gmail.com
  7. May 15, 2012, 10:39 pm

    I would settle for the Battleships Missouri the Wisconsin and half a dozen Littoral Combat Ships.

    There are accounts to settle with the Hizbollah- Iran and there are international energy resources

    to protect in the Eastern Meditaranean.

    The Battleships should be refurbished on the East and West Coast Shipyards providing needed jobs

    to American working man and woman.

    Vietnam Vereran 66-68 with two tours of duty in Vietnam

    Former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard worker.

    Semper Fi

    By: leonaks@gmail.com
  8. May 25, 2012, 10:37 am

    Why turn it into an educational exhibit when it can still be used to bombard middle eastern cities? Sorry Leo, I just don't see your argument. To think that "God's People" are going to get any more favor from God by killing other religious extremists (Yes, other) and tons of innocent civilians is beyond me.

    By: JoeNutt587@yahoo.com
  9. May 30, 2012, 10:02 pm

    It would be fantastic for the Iowa to be refurbished so she could continue her legacy. That’s probably not practical, but it’s a nice dream.

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