Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Lilie Lotus

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Helen Breznik

Mysterious Stranger

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bob Weil

The Internal Struggle

PHOTOGRAPH BY: George Politi

Yellow Room Front Hill Castle

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rad Drew

Mask Dream

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Marie Matthews

Sandhill

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Maddy McCoy

Chive

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Kimberly Post Rowe

The Unjaundice Eye

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bob Weil

Nicki Flower

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Allan Barns

Under the Flower

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bernhard Wasem

Intermediate Freguency

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Alan Kastner

Young Girl at Window

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Allison Pistohl

Winter Horse

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Adria Ellis

Illuminati

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Tracy J. Thomas

Water Lilly

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Adria Ellis

Avian Series

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Elizabeth Grilli

Thoughts Fly Free

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Benamon Tame

The Great Unknown

PHOTOGRAPH BY: George Politis

One Hundred Ten

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Markus Rivera

Long Day Wrong Way

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jacqueline Gaines

More galleries on Framework

return to gallery

Discovering the L.A. Mobile Arts Festival

Pictures in the News | April 8, 2014

In Monday's Pictures in the News, a beached panga-style boat, loaded with as much as a ton of marijuana, is pulled back into the water by firefighters after it washed ashore at...   View Post»

   

Discovering the L.A. Mobile Arts Festival

1932 gold prospecting in San Gabriel Canyon

Sep. 1932:  Prospector holds small gold nuggets found in the East Fork of the San Gabriel River. In a Sep. 25, 1932 Los Angeles Times front page story Jean Bosquet...   View Post»

   

Walking in the shadow of Edward Weston

Walking in the shadows of Edward Weston

By Mark Boster News photographers meet the most amazing people. On any given day it can be celebrities, felons, politicians or athletes, each with a story, each with...   View Post»

   

Discovering the L.A. Mobile Arts Festival

The Week in Pictures | Dec. 12-18, 2011

In this roundup of the Week in Pictures: former Penn State assistant football coach   View Post»

Discovering the L.A. Mobile Arts Festival

My iPhone photographs need a kick-start. Maybe I just need a few new ideas and inspiration. Or maybe I just need to organize and edit the 5,000 images that are taking up almost 15 gigs of space.

I never thought I would fill up the space on my 32 GB iPhone — those photos, movies, apps and podcasts really add up fast. Archiving, backing up and organizing always seems to be on my “to do” list.

Just this week alone, I have photos of my son’s weekend hockey game, my daughter’s homemade cookies, some scenic views captured while walking the dog, and my coffee cup.

None of this sounds too arty; there are no contest winners here, and they are clogging up my iPhone. I definitely need some artistic inspiration.

With this in mind, I decided to see how my photographs stacked up against the competition by checking out the L.A. Mobile Arts Festival 2012 in Santa Monica.

The show runs through Saturday, from noon to 6 p.m., at the Santa Monica Art Studios, located at 3026 Airport Ave.

When I entered the exhibit, the first thing I noticed was the installation created with 40 iPads. Of course, my first thought was 40 times $500 equals one expensive display, but it was very impressive as the photos rotated in random fashion.

The show in the converted airplane hangar is divided into a variety of themed rooms.

The exhibit of art created with mobile devices really puts into perspective how photography has changed over the years thanks to apps that are easier to use and much less expensive to use, compared to, say, a desktop computer.

I noticed that one of the most popular artistic effects used by the photographers was layering — combining multiple images into one. A few years ago, this technique used to be possible only with expensive photographic suites.

It’s hard to believe how cheap these apps for the iPhone and iPad have become. We grumble if we have to pay more than $3 for one.

At the same time, it seems like the end of the era of film and old-school cameras. Though there’s still a place for DSLR, it just seems to be increasingly pushed from the mainstream.

So if you use your phone or iPad to take photographs, then the L.A. Mobile Arts Festival is a must-see. It’s a great way to inspire the artist in all of us.

robert.lachman@latimes.com

Follow Robert Lachman on Twitter and Google+

Read more reviews and photography tips by Robert Lachman

No comments yet

Add a comment or a question.

If you are under 13 years of age you may read this message board, but you may not participate. Here are the full legal terms you agree to by using this comment form.

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until they've been approved.

Required

Required, will not be published