Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

One World Trade Center rises above the lower Manhattan skyline. Twelve years after terrorists destroyed the old World Trade Center, the new World Trade Center is becoming a reality, with a museum commemorating the attacks and two office towers where thousands of people will work set to open within the next year.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mark Lennihan / Associated Press

In this photo provided by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, one of the last two segments of the silver spire to be installed on top of One World Trade Center is hoisted to the top of the building on May 2, 2013. With the spire as its crown, the trade center will soar to a symbolic 1,776 feet in the air, a reference to the birth of the nation in 1776.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Port Authority / Associated Press

The view of Manhattan from the 100th-floor observation level of One World Trade Center.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Spencer Platt / Getty Images North America

Members of the media get a hard-hat tour of One World Observatory, on the 100th floor of the new One World Trade Center..

PHOTOGRAPH BY: STAN HONDA / AFP

The Manhattan skyline is seen from the One World Trade Center.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Victor J. Blue

Pedestrians cross the street in lower Manhattan as seen from One World Observatory on the 100th floor of One World Trade Center.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Spencer Platt / Getty Images North America

The Manhattan Bridge as seen from the One World Observatory on the 100th floor of One World Trade Center.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Spencer Platt / Getty Images North America

A view of One World Trade Center on April 2 as work continues on the tower.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: STAN HONDA / AFP

A view of the top of One World Trade Center on April 2 in New York. When completed, One World Trade Center will be the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere at 1,776 feet.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: STAN HONDA / AFP

One World Trade Center, under construction since 2006, officially surpassed the height of the Empire State Building on April 30, 2012, to become New York's tallest building. With its unfinished frame, the building stands at a little more than 1,250 feet high.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Ironworkers walk around the steel decking on the 100th story of One World Trade Center on April 30. New York's skyline got a new king that after the still unfinished World Trade Center tower, built to replace the destroyed Twin Towers, crept above the venerable Empire State Building.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Lucas Jackson / Pool

Ironworker Billy Geoghan climbs down an iron column after attaching beams into place on the 100th story of One World Trade Center on April 30.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Lucas Jackson / Pool Photo

The National September 11 Memorial can be seen from the 90th story of One World Trade Center on April 30.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Lucas Jackson / Pool

People view Lower Manhattan from Jersey City as construction continues on One World Trade Center.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mario Tama / Getty Images

One World Trade Center fills a gap between streets in Lower Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mario Tama / Getty Images

An ironworker eats lunch near the top of One World Trade Center.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Lucas Jackson / Pool Photo

Ironworkers weld steel decking at the top of One World Trade Center on April 30.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mark Lennihan / Pool

One World Trade Center, as viewed from the 72nd floor of Four World Trade Center, towers over the Hudson River on Sept. 7.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Harry John Roland, aka "the World Trade Center man," has been entertaining and educating passersby in Lower Manhattan since shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks. He speaks with people on Aug. 15, 2011.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A commemorative steel beam is raised at the site of One World Trade Center on Dec. 19, 2006. Several 25-ton steel beams were erected, marking the first vertical construction of the planned 1,776-foot tower at the site of the Twin Towers.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chris Hondros / Getty Images

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One World Trade Center climbs above Lower Manhattan

Construction continues on One World Trade Center, or 1 WTC, the centerpiece of the World Trade Center complex being built in Lower Manhattan. The tower was planned after the destruction of the original World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.

The initial design for the building was by architect Daniel Libeskind, who was selected after a competition in 2002. David M. Childs of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill eventually took over the design. Construction began in 2006, and members of the public marked the occasion with a ceremony at which the first 30-foot steel beam was signed and installed.

More photos:

The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001

The world observes the 10-year anniversary of Sept. 11

Scenes of 9/11 then and now

Covering 9/11: Strength amid sadness

1 Comment

  1. April 2, 2013, 10:54 am

    Unfortunately, it's not really the 100th floor.

    While the lobby is Floor 1, the next floor up is magically considered Floor 20. Floors 2 through 19 do not exist.

    Later, the building skips Floors, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98 and 99 as well.

    By: Bill D.

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