Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Homeowners association President Pinny Dembitzer surveys the Sea Gate neighborhood on Coney Island, N.Y.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

Parishioners of the Shrine Church of Our Lady of Solace in attend Mass on Sunday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

Residents of the Sea Gate community receive donated food, water and clothing.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

Residents of the Sea Gate community sort through donated clothing.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

Residents of the Sea Gate community wait for food, water and clothing.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

A congregant of Our Lady of Grace church prays during Mass.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Andrew Burton / Getty Images

Garbage lies piled on the street in Staten Island's New Dorp neighborhood

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Seth Wenig / AP

Cars damaged by super storm Sandy are surrounded by storm debris.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mark Lennihan / AP

A woman saves what she can from her mother's damaged home in the Breezy Point neighborhood of New York City.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Allison Joyce / Getty Images

Jeffrey Holloway begins the process of cleaning and renovating this home of a client at 56th and Central Ave. in Ocean City, N.J. Frustration is setting in for some New Jersey residents who are still without power and running low on food. Some residents say too much attention is being paid to the Shore and not enough to working people who are hurting.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Elizabeth Robertson / The Philadelphia Inquirer

Customers wait to fill gas cans and paint buckets at a service station.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

Special needs patient Catherine Perez, 25, is tended by her mother, Evelyn Perez. Catherine needs an oxygen machine to keep her alive. A generator is running the machine while power is out.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

Jurisel Evans, 1 year and eight months old, helps with donated clothes that were dropped off in front of a building in the New York's Rockaways.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Kathy Willens / Associated Press

A photo provided by the American Red Cross showing extensive damage to houses along the Jersey shore where entire neighborhoods were slammed by hurricane-force winds and waves.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Les Stone / American Red Cross / AMERICAN RED CROSS

People in Hoboken, N.J., board the NY Waterways ferry with the Manhattan skyline in the background. Sandy, which made landfall along the New Jersey shore, left parts of the state and the surrounding area without power, including much of Lower Manhattan south of 34th Street.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Brendan Smialowski / AFP / Getty Images

Commuters ride the F train in New York City. Limited public transit has returned to New York.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Allison Joyce / Getty Images

Thousands of people wait to board city buses into Manhattan at Barclay's Center in Brooklyn as the city continues to recover from super storm Sandy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

A man waits in line with jerry cans at a gas station in Hazlet Township, N.J.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Andrew Burton / Getty Images

The Casino Pier roller coaster in Seaside Heights, N.J., sits in the ocean after the pier was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Reynolds / European Pressphoto Agency

A car from an amusement park on the Seaside Heights, N.J., boardwalk is partly buried in the sand at Mantoloking, about eight miles to the north.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Wayne Parry / Associated Press

Flood water passes debris from a destroyed home in Mantoloking, N.J.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Wayne Parry / Associated Press

Sand from the beach reaches the windows of a home as a vehicle rests on its side in Seaside Heights, N.J.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Julio Cortez / Associated Press

President Obama and FEMA administrator Craig Fugate, left, watch as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie talks with a woman at Brigantine Beach Community Center in Brigantine, N.J.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press

The entrance to the South Ferry subway station in Lower Manhattan remains flooded.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

A truck is almost entirely submerged in the Battery Park Underpass in Lower Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

Water is pumped out of a subway station in Lower Manhattan near Battery Park.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

Aerial view of the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy to the New Jersey coast, taken during a search-and-rescue mission by the New Jersey Army National Guard.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MASTER SGT. MARK OLSEN / US AIR FORCE

A family navigates their way home after flood waters receded to walkable levels.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP / Getty Images

People survey street damage and debris left by flood water from Hurricane Sandy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Bocchieri / Getty Images

Rocky Minotti uses a pump to remove 10 feet of flood water from his family's home.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP / Getty Images

A man looks toward the New York Stock Exchange as he returns to work on Wall Street as New Yorkers cope with the aftermath of Sandy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: TIMOTHY A. CLARY / AFP / Getty Images

A boardwalk and waterfront property are heavily damaged.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MICHAEL REYNOLDS / EPA

Thousands of gallons of water are pumped from the lower floors of a building on Wall Street as the city tries to recover from the effects of Hurricane Sandy in New York City.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: JUSTIN LANE / EPA

With the power out, Dong Wang lights candles to serve food at Carol's Bun restaurant in Manhattan's Chinatown.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The Battery Park underpass is flooded. The Brooklyn Battery Tunnel and Holland Tunnel also are flooded.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Flooding in the the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The flooded Breezy Point neighborhood in Queens.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A cat is safely evacuated from Breezy Point.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The storm's aftermath in Queens.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Times Square is deserted on the morning after the storm.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Residents in Lower Manhattan begin the cleanup.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Benny Jakupoj supervises the cleanup of his Lower Manhattan restaurant.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

With no power, Scott Warren carries his daughter up seven flights of stairs to their apartment.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The storm sparked fires that ravaged the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Firefighters mop up an area in the Breezy Point neighborhood, where dozens of homes burned.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A firefighter works in the Breezy Point neighborhood.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Flooded homes after Sandy made landfall.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Coast Guard / AFP

People view the John B. Caddell, a 700-ton tanker that washed up on the shore of Staten Island.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mehdi Taamallah / AFP

Eva Miranda, 27, battles through howling wind and snow as she makes her way across the campus at Appalachian State University on Tuesday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Chuck Liddy / Raleigh News & Observer

A woman views fire damage in the Breezy Point area of Queens.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Stan Honda / AFP

Sveinn Storm pumps water out of his flooded Storm Bros. Ice Cream Factory store in downtown Annapolis, Md.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Blake Sell / Associated Press

A parking lot of yellow cabs is flooded.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Charles Sykes / Associated Press

Foundations and pilings are all that remain of brick buildings and a boardwalk in Atlantic City.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Seth Wenig / Associated Press

Waves pound a lighthouse on the shores of Lake Erie.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Tony Dejak / Associated Press

Jason Locke sweeps water and mud from his parents' home.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Peter Pereira / Standard Times of New Bedford

Taylor Tuzzalo, 18, came to take a look at a ship grounded in Staten Island.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Amanda Zink cleans up a store in Lower Manhattan called "The Salty Paw."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Cars float up from an underground garage in a mixture of storm water and gasoline in Lower Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The Battery Park underpass is flooded.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Police officers inspect a flooded subway station in Lower Manhattan. All subway and train service has been canceled.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The storm destroyed a boardwalk and flooded apartment buildings.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mario Tama / Getty Images

The flooded Battery Park underpass.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Louis Lanzano / Associated Press

Floating cars in Lower Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Andrew Burton / Getty Images

Fire destroyed a home on Long Island.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jason DeCrow / Associated Press

Andrea Grolon walks through waist-deep water Tuesday in the Metropolitan Trailer Park. Grolon, a resident of the trailer park, was wading through oil covered water to help others get to rescue vehicles in the wake of super storm Sandy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Craig Ruttle / Associated Press

A street sign is partially buried in sand Tuesday morning after a storm surge from Sandy pushed the Atlantic Ocean over the beach.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Evans / Associated Press

A tree is held up by power lines Tuesday in the wake of Sandy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: CJ GUNTHER / EPA

Hospital workers evacuate patient Deborah Dadlani from NYU Langone Medical Center during Hurricane Sandy on Monday evening. More than 200 patients were evacuated from the hospital after backup generators failed due to flooding following a power outage.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Heiman / Getty Images

George Hendricks, who has lived in Manhattan for 50 years, watches the storm surge Sunday evening in Battery Park.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

People are kept off the waterfront in Lower Manhattan on Sunday.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The front of an apartment building on 8th Ave. in Manhattan collapsed due to high winds from Hurricane Sandy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

The New York Stock Exchange was closed for only the second time in history because of weather.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A New York police officer guards a closed subway station in Lower Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

Hurricane Sandy causes flooding in West Babylon, N.Y., on the south shore of Long Island.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

City workers put more sandbags in place in Lower Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A closed subway station in Lower Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times

A flooded Ocean Avenue in Cape May, N.J.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

A closed transit terminal in Philadelphia.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: William Thomas Cain / Getty Images

Toppled scaffolding in Lower Manhattan.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

North Michigan Avenue in Atlantic City, N.J.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Michael Ein / The Press of Atlantic City / AP

The rising Hudson River in Edgewater, N.J.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Craig Ruttle / Associated Press

Flooded houses in North Wildwood, N.J.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Dale Gerhard / The Press of Atlantic City / AP

A flooded pier in Rockaway Beach, N.Y.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Justin Lane / European Pressphoto Agency

Ocean waves kick up near homes along Peggoty Beach in Scituate, Mass. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Elise Amendola / Associated Press

Satellite image provided by NASA shows Hurricane Sandy churning off the East Coast in the Atlantic Ocean.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: NASA

A sailboat smashes on the rocks after breaking free from its mooring on City Island in New York.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: DON EMMERT / AFP / Getty Images

Adam Howard, right, works to clean the inside of Bubba's restaurant on the water in Virginia Beach, Va. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy flooded the business at high tide.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Steve Helber / Associated Press

Waters from Hurricane Sandy start to flood Beach Avenue in Cape May, N.J.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Rough surf off the Atlantic Ocean breaks over the dunes Monday morning in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Evans / Associated Press

Kendall Osborne paddles down Catalpa St. in the Edgewater neighborhood of Norfolk, Va before high tide Monday morning.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Stephen M. Katz / The Virginian-Pilot

Residents ride their bikes to get a first hand look at Hurricane Sandy as they roll through the flooded street on Savannah Road in Bowers Beach, Del., where winds begin to increase as Hurricane Sandy hits Delaware.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Suchat Pederson / The News Journal

Tourists in Times Square with plastic ponchos prepare for Hurricane Sandy expected to hit the city later tonight.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: TIMOTHY A. CLARY / AFP / Getty Images

Richard Thomas walks through the flood waters in front of his home after assisting neighbors as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast in Fenwick Island, Del.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Alex Brandon / Associated Press

Storm surge hits a small tree as winds from Hurricane Sandy reach Seaside Park in Bridgeport, Conn. Water from Long Island Sound spilled into roadways and towns along the Connecticut shoreline Monday, the first signs of flooding from a storm that threatens to deliver a devastating surge of seawater.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jessica Hill / Associated Press

A lone man walks on the Chatham Coast Guard Beach several hours before the expected landfall of Hurricane Sandy in Chatham, Mass.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: MATT CAMPBELL / EPA

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Hurricane Sandy hammers East Coast

Floods and fires, seawater surges and electrical outages, fierce rains and lashing winds continued to pummel parts of the Northeast as Sandy continued its destructive march on Tuesday.

From Chicago to the Atlantic Ocean, through major cities including New York, Philadelphia and Washington, the impact of the storm continued to grow. Transportation systems in New York and New Jersey were crippled. More than 16,000 airlines flights have been canceled.

Sandy continued to generate wind gusts up to 80 mph and dump heavy rain and snow in some areas. Many residents in coastal areas awoke to nasty winds and flash flooding from record surges pushed by the winds, high tides and a full moon.

READ STORY: Monster storm Sandy marches west, leaving death, chaos in its wake

Hurricane Sandy made landfall on Monday evening, arriving ahead of schedule with a punch as powerful as feared.

The storm, with winds and driving rains that have already caused flooding up and down the Eastern Seaboard, made its heralded landfall near Atlantic City, N.J., around 8 p.m. Eastern time. It arrived slightly earlier than forecasters had originally projected because it had picked up speed, moving at about 28 mph.

More than 750,000 people were reported to have lost power across the region. Cities including Washington and Boston closed their mass-transit systems. Schools were shuttered and shelters began to fill with hundreds of thousands of people ordered to leave their homes and seek safety from a trio of storms: Sandy, a blast of cold air from Canada and another system blowing in from the West.

Interactive: Scenes of Sandy’s destruction then and now

9 Comments

  1. October 30, 2012, 12:07 pm

    May the Lord Yeshua take care of this situation

    God Bless all

    By: davidrai31@yahoo.com
  2. October 31, 2012, 12:01 pm

    If gods could do anything to help or "bless" people, don't you think they would have prevented this? That sounds nice to ask gods for help but it doesn't do anything. If you want to help, don't ask gods, grab some tools and get to work.

    By: art
  3. October 31, 2012, 11:58 pm

    Reblogged this on Sky Choice and commented:
    Pictures speak louder than words sometimes.

    By: Skyler
  4. November 1, 2012, 8:26 am

    Art, your theology is severely flawed and shows a tremendous amount of ignorance. What is incredible, is that you have spoken in such a condescending tone that you appear as if you have the most high knowledgeable source. If a person believes that his or her prayer can help, who are you to shoot it down? You known nothing of his/her situation. They may be unable to "grab some tools and get to work". Its fairly obvious that you some inner conflict with the concept of a loving God and have not figured it out yet. I think many of us can identify.

    However, why pretend as if you know what is going on? You have reduced God to be merely a tool to keep us safe and happy. I would like to point out that this way of thinking hints to a man-centered universe. The Creator is infinitely ABOVE us, and is not something that we can wield to our own disposal. He is untameable and proceeds by his own rules. But, for the sake of argument, even if he did have to answer to us, I'm curious as to what leads you to believe that we are entitled to having him save us?

    Lastly, I GUARANTEE that among the population of those that will get off of their butts and drop everything in their lives to help, a substantial percentage of that population will be people who would say that they felt God mandated that they be his worldly hands and feet. I know from experience, because I was apart of such an effort with Katrina. Where were the agnostics and atheists then? I know where God was…

    By: anthony
  5. November 1, 2012, 10:02 am

    Thank you LA Times for posting all these pictures. They are stunning and give a clear description of the devastation that occurred. I was having a hard time grasping the scope of the damage until I saw these.

    By: Guest1
  6. November 1, 2012, 2:59 pm

    You are the 1 pretending to know what is going on. A creator above us that plays by his own rules? Which god and from which religion have you declared to be the infinite and untamable? There are many gods and religions to choose from but I am sure there is only 1 for you because through your vast research and knowledge you declared yours to be right. Is your lord Yeshua, the god from the first commenter? You speak as if atheist do not care for or help their fellow humans. Only people that believe in a god care for other people and their misfortune? Your judgement of atheist people is ignorant and flawed. I will try to remember how loving and helpful people with religion and a blind faith in a god are when they are killing each other in the name of their god and difference in beliefs. It's not a man centered universe? I guess you have hung out with, had conversations, and have seen some of these gods pitching in to help?
    Lastly, I GUARANTEE that among the people that will help, a just as substantial percentage of those people would say they do not believe in god and are there because they love fellow humans and do not want to see anyone suffer.

    By: art
  7. November 1, 2012, 11:42 pm

    RISING SEAS?

    By: harpon@att.net
  8. November 3, 2012, 9:35 pm

    All theology debates aside, I agree with Art's earlier comment regarding lending a hand. Actions help.Voicing pleasant platitudes online is a gesture requiring little effort.

    By: Kelly
  9. November 5, 2012, 1:48 pm

    L.a. times, why didn't you post my first reply to anthony? I guess the bible references to such a loving god were too violent and graphic? The stories are straight from the good book . Tales of rape, murder, lack of women's rights, denying disabled, deformed, and homosexuals into the "kingdom" by law of god are not fit for this site? I don't think the religious people that try to get books taken from schools have read the one they think they are standing up for. anthony, if you had seen my first post, you would have seen that i too was in LA. after Katrina. I was re-roofing houses with and working side by side with many atheist. I did not see god but what i did see was a great deal of suffering, no organization, and resources standing idle. We can only hope the effort in the N.E. does not leave the truly needy without help. Will the effort be better from what we learned during Katrina? Yes! Will the effort be better because it is not in the poorer south, far from Wall St.? Absolutely!

    By: art

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