Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Mike Carlson, 19, teaches preschool-age children Yurok words at the Klamath Family Head Start program. The Yurok tribal language revitalization program has developed curricula for all ages.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Del Norte High School student Chuski Scott holds up Yurok language flash cards in a class taught by Barbara McQuillen.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Archie Thompson, 93, is a Yurok tribal elder and one of the last remaining native speakers. "They didn't want Indian language spoken," Thompson said of the boarding school he attended as a young boy. "You couldn't do your own culture."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Jim McQuillen, education director of the Yurok tribe, visits tribal elder Archie Thompson, 93. McQuillen, who oversees the program to revive the Yurok language, has learned a great deal from elders like Thompson.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Yurok Tribal Chairman Thomas O'Rourke talks about his tribe's cultural history. O'Rourke is supportive of the tribe's efforts to teach its native language.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Carole Lewis teaches Yurok to students at Eureka High School, which last fall became the fifth and largest school in Northern California to launch a Yurok-language program.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Del Norte High students Kara Scott, left, Sasha Mitchell and Sativa Wilson listen as Barbara McQuillen teaches Yurok. At one time academics predicted that the Yurok language would soon be extinct. Thanks in part to classes like this one, at last count there were more than 300 basic Yurok speakers.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

The Klamath River flows into the Pacific Ocean. The Yurok people have lived along the banks of the Klamath for centuries.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

A light dusting of snow covers a traditional Yurok house in the Klamath River area of Northern California.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

Jim McQuillen stands inside a traditional Yurok house as he gives a tour around tribal areas along the Northern California coast.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times

More galleries on Framework

return to gallery

Reviving the Yurok language

In 1949, the snowman socked Los Angeles

From Jan. 9 through 12, 1949, snow fell in Los Angeles and Southern California.  In a Jan. 10, 1999, Los Angeles Times article, columnist Cecilia Rasmussen wrote:   View Post»

   

Rappel

Over the Edge fundraisers rappel down Westin Bonaventure Hotel

More than 100 people rappelled from the 32nd floor of the Westin Bonaventure Hotel during the second annual Over the Edge fundraiser for Los Angeles-area Scouting programs. Each...   View Post»

   

Reviving the Yurok language

Pictures in the News | Sept. 8, 2011

In today's Pictures in the News, preparations for Oktoberfest get underway in Munich, a line of Bogota riot police is plastered with various colors of paint by protesters,...   View Post»

   

Reviving the Yurok language

Destruction and radiation danger in aftermath of the Japan earthquake

In the aftermath of Japan's devastating 9.0 earthquake and ensuing tsunami, the death toll is feared to be more than 10,000. Fires continue to burn in several of the...   View Post»

Reviving the Yurok language

By Lee Romney

EUREKA, Calif. — Carole Lewis throws herself into her work as if something big was at stake.

“Pa’-ah,” she tells her Eureka High School class, gesturing at a bottle of water. She whips around and doodles a crooked little fish on the blackboard, hinting at the dip she’s prepared with “ney-puy” — salmon, key to the diet of California’s largest Native American tribe.

For thousands of years before Western settlers arrived, the Yurok thrived in dozens of villages along the Klamath River. By the 1990s, however, academics had predicted their language soon would be extinct. As elders passed away, the number of native speakers dropped to six.

But tribal leaders would not let the language die.

Last fall, Eureka High became the fifth and largest school in Northern California to launch a Yurok-language program, marking the latest victory in a Native language revitalization program widely lauded as the most successful in the state.

At last count, there were more than 300 basic Yurok speakers, 60 with intermediate skills, 37 who are advanced and 17 who are considered conversationally fluent.

Read story: Revival of nearly extinct Yurok language is a success story

No comments yet

Add a comment or a question.

If you are under 13 years of age you may read this message board, but you may not participate. Here are the full legal terms you agree to by using this comment form.

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until they've been approved.

Required

Required, will not be published