Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

A double exposure of a girl and her umbrella in front of the Coachella Stage, during the second weekend of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of Sarah Weston, 28, from Venice, dancing to Allen Stone with an American flag scarf as a flag during the second weekend of the Coachella fest.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

The start of the double-exposure adventure began on Thursday, getting credentials before the start of the second weekend of Coachella.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of Jesse Trbovich performing with Kurt Vile and the Violators and the crowd listening to them perform on the Outdoor Stage.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of music fans who carpooled to get their passes before the start of the second weekend of the desert music festival.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of Jan Kemper, 33, of Berlin, Germany, enjoying some down time in front of the main Coachella Stage.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure combining a polo sign from the Empire Polo Club and a backdrop of palm trees and Le Grande Wheel.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of a music fan during the Modest Mouse performance on the main Coachella Stage at Coachella.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of crowds crossing the polo field during the second weekend of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of crowds in the Do LaB at Coachella on April 19.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of crowds waiting for a show on the main Coachella Stage.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of music fans trying to cool off in some shade.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of crowds relaxing in front of the Outdoor Stage.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure shows a common outfit on the hot weekend (the bathing suit) and a map of the polo grounds.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of two people in different resting positions in front of the Outdoor Stage.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure of a music fan resting in the shade of a fence and another sunbathing in front of the Outdoor Stage.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

A double exposure that combines two colorful nighttime skylines with Le Grande Wheel, the Power Station and the Do LaB.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times

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A Coachella double take

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A Coachella double take

By Jay L. Clendenin

At the risk of repeating myself, I have one of the greatest jobs in the world.

Every day I go to work, I’m off to interesting places, meeting new people and, the best part, I have the opportunity to bring back pictures from all those adventures. One of my favorite events is the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival every spring. This year marked my fifth festival, and I wanted to try something different from my usual “Faces” gallery.

I decided to go “old school,” you know, slow down the creative process and shoot film. That’s right, digital world, I said it: film. In addition to my two digital bodies, I opted to shoot multiple exposures, meaning on each frame of film, I would have exposed two pictures. Yes, it’s true, many of the latest digital cameras offer this function, either in utilizing their high dynamic range (HDR) option (with Canon’s 5D Mark III )  or the multiple exposure capability, but shooting with film slows down the creative process and requires more thought (and occasional notes!) when making frames. I created some double exposures within a couple of minutes and a couple of feet of each other (example: Girl in white top, on someone’s shoulders), while others spanned nearly 30 minutes as I was trying to find the right background to blend with the first frame, or vice versa (example: “All Night Long” guy and palm trees).

I’m not anti-technology. I can assure you I love my high-end digital cameras (Canon EOS 5d MarkII and Mark III), but I’m definitely all for slowing down the go-go-go mentality that has become all too common with these modern advances. Every time I clicked the shutter with my film camera (Canon Eos 1V), I considered it a unique image that I couldn’t immediately check on the back of the camera and make five more attempts to “improve.” That’s not to say I didn’t try a shot several times, like when in the DoLaB, where crowds are jumping, water is spraying and the occasional inflatable whale sails overhead. It was pandemonium, and I shot 15 combined frames hoping for one to capture what I was experiencing.

At the conclusion of the three-day festival, I had shot seven rolls of film. After processing the film, printing and choosing my selections came three days of scanning on our Imacon Flextight Precision II scanner. Add to that nearly five combined nights of removing dust spots from the scans (I realized this is a process I definitely do not miss in our conversion to digital cameras).

1 Comment

  1. May 27, 2013, 9:08 am

    Don’t miss removing dust spots? This means you don’t remove sensor dust spots from your digital shots?

    By: Allen Row

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