Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

The Jia Apartments, a large residential development, right, rises at the corner of Broadway and Cesar E. Chavez Boulevard.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

People gather in Central Plaza for Chinatown Summer Nights, which features dance, food trucks and live music.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Julia Wall / Los Angeles Times

A merchant reads a Chinese-language newspaper while tending a stall at Far East Plaza.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A pedestrian walks past a gift shop at the intersection of Broadway and Ord Street.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A statue of the action-movie icon Bruce Lee is a new addition to Central Plaza.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A waitress serves customers at a small cafe in Far East Plaza.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Customers check out the merchandise in a Chinese herbs store along Broadway.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Day campers from the Westside peer into the window of a restaurant along Broadway.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A pedestrian shields herself from the heat in Chinatown.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Christina House / For The Times

New development is planned for the corner of Broadway and College Street.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

A visitor walks through Central Plaza.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

The Hop Louie restaurant rises out of Chinatown Plaza, a few blocks away from Los Angeles City Hall.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles' old Chinatown in 1934. Chinatown residents are shown here as they read the news. This original Chinatown neighborhood was razed to make way for the construction of Union Station.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

Entrance to the new China City, which celebrated its gala opening Aug. 2, 1939.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

A Sun Yat-sen parade in Los Angeles' old Chinatown in 1925.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

Old Chinatown and Chop Suey restaurant with the construction of Union Station in the background in 1937.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

A 1939 photo, looking north on Spring Street through "new" Chinatown.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

The block along North Los Angeles Street in 1948. The area was later razed to make way for more traffic. The historic Lugo House is at the extreme left.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

The last buildings of old Chinatown, at the corner of Sunset Boulevard and North Los Angeles Street. They would be torn down for the Hollywood Freeway and Civic Center projects in 1949.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

An estimated 30,000 attended the Year of the Ram Chinese New Year celebration on Feb. 10, 1967.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jack Gaunt / Los Angeles Times

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For decades, the historic district north of downtown has declined as booming Chinese enclaves in the San Gabriel Valley monopolized flows of new immigrants and investment. Today, the aging community can sometimes have the feel of a museum, with only a few second- and third-generation locals staying to run their family businesses. After several failed attempts at revitalization over the last decade, community leaders are trying to embrace a different vision of the area: a Chinatown that is less Chinese.

Read Frank Shyong’s article: As L.A.’s Chinatown changes, some see opportunity for renewal

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