Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Cliven D. Bundy's cattle make their way across the Virgin River on some of Bundy's 150 square miles of property in Bunkerville, Nev.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

The sun sets over some of the 150 square miles of land owned by rancher Cliven D. Bundy. "We've been developing this land for over 100 years. This is a choice land, a beautiful land with lots of resources," said Bundy. Federal officials say, though, that the land is habitat of the protected desert tortoise.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Rancher Cliven D. Bundy, 67, is reflected in a mirror at his home. He grazes his cattle on land overseen by the Bureau of Land Management but has refused to pay grazing fees since 1993, saying the agency is trying to strip his family of land-use rights. "I am the last man standing," he says. "And I will stand and do whatever it takes to protect my life, liberty and property."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

A cowboy hat rests on the dashboard of rancher Cliven D. Bundy's truck while he drives on his ranch. A federal court gave Bundy until Aug. 23 to remove 500 head of cattle from the Bureau of Land Management land. So far nothing has happened -- yet.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Rancher Cliven Bundy, 67, closes a gate on his ranch. For two decades, Bundy has conducted a one-man range war with federal officials over his grazing of hundreds of cattle on 150 square miles of arid land overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Cliven D. Bundy finishes breakfast with his wife, Carol, in the family ranch home. She supports her husband's stance: "I have a shotgun," she says. "We’re ready to do what we have to do, but we’d rather win this in the court of public opinion."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

A metal sculpture of cowboys riding rests on the mantel at the home of rancher Cliven D. Bundy.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Arden Bundy, 15, herds cattle on his family's ranch. Cliven Bundy wants to hand over the property to Arden one day.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Arden Bundy, 15, takes a drink of water from one of the water tanks in a remote area of the family ranch. The water from this tank is redirected to other wells on the property for cattle to drink.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

Cliven D. Bundy walks on his ranch. He says federal overregulation has driven other ranchers out of business, leaving him the last man standing.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

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Last man standing: Range wars in Nevada

For two decades, Cliven Bundy has waged a one-man range war with federal officials over his cattle’s grazing on 150 square miles of scrub desert in Nevada overseen by the Bureau of Land Management. Since 1993, he’s refused to pay BLM grazing fees.

Bundy believes big government is trying to sabotage his plans to one day hand over the ranch’s reins to his son, by stripping Bundy of land-use rights his family spent a century earning. He says regulation has already driven scores of fellow ranchers out of business in sprawling Clark County, leaving him as the last man standing.

Photographs by Genaro Molina, Los Angeles Times; story by John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times. For full story click here.

3 Comments

  1. September 15, 2013, 2:12 pm

    The last of the Sagebrush Rebellion? You’re not likely to see anyone in Nevada state government supporting Cowboy Bundy, as they know the truth: without federal subsidies Nevada would be “broke”.

    The grazing “fees” that Bundy complains about are laughably miniscule. The real cause of his angst is the low price of beef. No Free Lunch for you, cowboy!

    By: Bruno Marr
  2. September 21, 2013, 10:58 am

    Wow you really think in a "cowboy's" life they are looking for a free lunch? Just think about what it took to get that steak on your plate next time. Or the leather in your shoes & etc… It was the sweat of a hardworking "cowboy" that made it possible.

    By: Bella
  3. March 31, 2014, 12:21 pm

    Bruno, sorry but you demonstrate a gross ignorance of private property rights and what it takes to acquire them. The foundation of America was John Locke's philosophy. It begins with self-ownership. We each own ourselves. The only other options would be for someone else to own us (we call that slavery). Or we each own a pro-rata share of the other. We call that communism.

    Locke went further to explain how how property rights originate. A self-owning man finds a previously unclaimed resource, mixes his labor (sweat) with it and the result (product) is an extension of him and therefore his rightfully owned property.

    It is impossible for government to ethically own that land or anything else for that matter because government does not possess anything that it did not previously take from someone else at the point of a gun.

    Low price of beef? Now THAT is laughable. At the moment beef prices are at all time record highs. You really should confine your commentary to things you know at least a little something about.

    By: flyoverp

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