Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Cement workers pose during construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct at the north portal. The image was published in the Jan. 1, 1913, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

Aqueduct workers prepare to line a channel with concrete. This photo was published in the June 18, 1911, Los Angeles Times with the caption "Dressing Crew."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Library

L.A.'s Board of Water Commissioners at the time of the aqueduct's approval. From left: John J. Fay, J.M. Elliott, Moses H. Sherman, William Mead, Fred L. Baker.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Department of Water and Power

This photo of aqueduct workers was published in the June 18, 1911, Los Angeles Times with the caption "Steam Shovel No. 10, Olancha division." (Pencil crop marks on the image do not match the 1911 publication, indicating a later use.)

PHOTOGRAPH BY: West Coast Art Co.

Painters work in the Bee Canyon Siphon section of the aqueduct in December 1931 in advance of the installation of a new generating unit in one of the system's power plants.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Department of Water and Power

The fathers of the Los Angeles Aqueduct, from left: Joseph B. Lippincott, an engineer; former L.A. Mayor Fred Eaton; and William Mulholland, the city's chief water engineer. This photograph appeared in the Los Angeles Times on Aug. 6, 1906.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Department of Water and Power

Pedestrians in downtown Los Angeles in 1912, a year before the aqueduct would begin to fuel the city's rapid expansion.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Library

Workers pose during construction of the aqueduct in this photo published in the Los Angeles Times on June 18, 1911, with the caption "End view of false works."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Library

A mule team hauls section of pipe. This print was obtained from the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power in 1963, but the image was originally published in the Sept. 22, 1911, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Library

A steam shovel digs conduit for the Los Angeles Aqueduct. The image was published in the Jan. 1, 1912, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Library

Reconstruction continues on the aqueduct at No Name Canyon after a dynamite explosion. This photo was published in the May 31, 1927, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: George Watson / Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Aqueduct, showing the siphon at Pine Canyon, circa 1910. The air-tight siphons along the aqueduct allow it to operate entirely by gravity flow.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: USC Special Collections

Jess Hession, Inyo County district attorney, left, and J. Clark Sellers, a criminologist, examine dynamite found near the aqueduct after a section of pipe at No Name Canyon was blown up in May 1927. This unpublished image was probably taken in 1927 or 1928.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

The scene at No Name Canyon after a dynamite attack destroyed 400 feet of pipe on May 27, 1927. This photo was published in the Feb. 24, 1928, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

William Mulholland, chief water engineer of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, speaks at ceremonies marking the opening of the aqueduct Nov. 5, 1913. (The lower left corner and sky above Mulholland and the hills were cut out for publication in the next day's Los Angeles Times.)

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

The opening ceremonies for the Los Angeles Aqueduct in Sylmar on Nov. 5, 1913, drew more than 40,000 spectators.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

Water passes over the Cascades section of the aqueduct on Oct. 16, 1913, in part for a test of the system and also to allow pictures to be made for the forthcoming opening ceremonies.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

The aqueduct opened Nov. 5, 1913. The Los Angeles Times headline the next day: "Silver Torrent Crowns the City's Mighty Achievement."

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

The scene at the formal opening of the Los Angeles Aqueduct on Nov. 5, 1913. Adna Chaffee, a retired Army general who served as president of the city's Board of Public Works, turned the wheel that allowed the water to flow.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Historical Collection-Security First National Bank of Los Angeles.

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L.A. Aqueduct: The origins of a 100-year story

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2 Comments

  1. October 28, 2013, 4:54 pm

    Nice photo and videos! I’d love to see more historical photographs like these for major events of long ago.

    By: Ian Mega
  2. November 8, 2013, 5:53 pm

    When I was 13 my father bought the land next to the Cascades and we moved onto the ranch property to raise alfalfa, as well as American Saddle Bred horses. We had almost 100 head at one time and I have many found memories of the land, and the Cascades. This was before the freeways and before the second cascade , big enclosed pipe. We were there fore that too. In fact the DWP took our land to construct the addition cascade as welll as new power lines. We found that we were living on the most strategic corridor in Los Angeles.

    By: John

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