Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

A female member of the Basij paramilitary militia receives bullets during a training session in Tehran in August 2013. Authorities created the Basij, which means mobilization in Persian, just after the country'­s 1979 Islamic Revolution. It is part of Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guard.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ebrahim Noroozi / Associated Press

A Basij trainer shows women how to use an AK-47 rifle during a session in Tehran.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ebrahim Noroozi / Associated Press

Women in the Basij paramilitary attend a training session in Tehran. The Basij has its roots as a volunteer fighting group during the 1980-88 war with Iraq. It then developed as a grass-roots defender of the system, working as Islamic morality police or busting up pro-reform gatherings or publications.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ebrahim Noroozi / Associated Press

A member of the Basij paramilitary militia aims her rifle as an instructor helps her during a summer training session in Tehran. With a presence in nearly every city and town across Iran, the paramilitary Basij volunteer corps has an ever-increasing influence on life in the Islamic Republic.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ebrahim Noroozi / Associated Press

A trainer walks past female members of the Basij during a training session in Tehran. Estimates of membership in the Basij range as high as a million.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ebrahim Noroozi / Associated Press

Members of the Basij volunteer militia fire their weapons during a training session.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ebrahim Noroozi / Associated Press

Members of the Basij attend a training session in Tehran in September 2013. The Basij is part of Iran'­s powerful Revolutionary Guard.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ebrahim Noroozi / Associated Press

Basij members load their rifles during a training session. Basij branches can be found in all governmental bodies, universities and schools. Volunteers often enjoy favorable treatment from the government, particularly in securing jobs in the public sector.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ebrahim Noroozi / Associated Press

Members of the Basij march during a training session in Tehran.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ebrahim Noroozi / Associated Press

More galleries on Framework

return to gallery

Photo essay | Iran's paramilitary Basij volunteer corps

When Route 66 was fading away

By 1977, most of old U.S 66 was replaced by the post-World War II interstate system. Some sections become frontage roads, others abandoned. Route 66 signs were being removed. ...   View Post»

   

Photo essay | Iran's paramilitary Basij volunteer corps

Pictures in the News | May 1, 2014

Thursday's Pictures in the News begins in Turkey, where police used water cannons and tear gas to disperse thousands of protesters who tried to defy a Labor Day ban on...   View Post»

   

Leonardo DiCaprio Throughout the Years

Leonardo DiCaprio through the years

I imagine you could go to just about any country and say "Leonardo DiCaprio" or at least mention the movie "Titanic" and you're likely to get some sort of confirmation that...   View Post»

   

Photo essay | Iran's paramilitary Basij volunteer corps

Pictures in the News | October 2, 2013

Wednesday's Pictures in the News begins in Southern California, where President Obama's Affordable Care Act stumbled out of the gate with computer glitches, long hold times and...   View Post»

   

Photo essay | Iran's paramilitary Basij volunteer corps

Pictures in the News | May 15, 2013

Wednesday's Pictures in the News begins in Los Angeles as hockey referee Lonnie Cameron tries to avoid a collision with Kings center Trevor Lewis and two San Jose Sharks players...   View Post»

   

Photo essay | Iran's paramilitary Basij volunteer corps

Pictures in the News | Dec. 13, 2012

In Thursday's Pictures in the News: a scuffle breaks out during the second session of the newly elected Ukrainian parliament in Kiev; Sikh Scots Guards soldier Jatenderpal Singh...   View Post»

   

Photo essay | Iran's paramilitary Basij volunteer corps

Pictures in the News | Oct. 2, 2012

In Tuesday's Pictures in the News: In Hong Kong, rescuers check a partially submerged charter boat after it collided with a tugboat and sank, killing 38 people; in Jerusalem,...   View Post»

   

Photo essay | Iran's paramilitary Basij volunteer corps

Pictures in the News | June 2, 2011

A few highlights from today's Pictures in the News: the aftermath of Wednesday's tornadoes that ripped through Massachusetts; the sky turns orange as a sandstorm envelops...   View Post»

   

Photo essay | Iran's paramilitary Basij volunteer corps

Pictures in the News | March 23, 2011

Wednesday's Pictures in the News bring time into focus with a passerby next to a gigantic ad for Swiss watchmaker Rolex at the Baselword fair in Switzerland, where watchmakers...   View Post»

   

Day of the Dead | Día de los Muertos

Day of the Dead | Día de los Muertos in Los Angeles

The Day of the Dead holiday, or Día de los Muertos, culminates on Nov. 2, and Angelenos have marked the occasion in recent days with activities including processions and...   View Post»

Photo essay | Iran’s paramilitary Basij volunteer corps

TEHRAN, Iran — With a presence in nearly every city and town across Iran, the paramilitary Basij volunteer corps has an ever-increasing influence on life in the Islamic Republic.

Authorities created the Basij, which means mobilization in Persian, just after the country’s 1979 Islamic Revolution. It is part of Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guard.

The Basij has its roots as a volunteer fighting group in the 1980-88 war with Iraq. It then developed as a grass-roots defender of the system — taking on roles such as Islamic morality police at checkpoints and parks or as shock troops busting up pro-reform gatherings or publications. Precise numbers on Basij membership are not published, but some estimates range as high as 1 million or more.

The Basij responds to emergencies like earthquakes and other natural disasters. It also has influence online: The Basij has a group of hackers made up of university teachers, students and clerics that launch attacks on websites of “enemies,” a state-backed newspaper reported in 2011. It also monitors social media and plans to begin teaching “drone-hunting” to students.

Basij branches can be found in all governmental bodies, universities and schools. Volunteers often enjoy favorable treatment from the government, particularly in securing jobs in the public sector.

– Associated Press

No comments yet

Add a comment or a question.

If you are under 13 years of age you may read this message board, but you may not participate. Here are the full legal terms you agree to by using this comment form.

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until they've been approved.

Required

Required, will not be published