Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

Geologist Rosalind Munro of AMEC, a geotechnical consulting firm, at the Wilshire Grand tower construction site in downtown L.A. Before construction started, Munro went down a borehole eight stories deep to answer questions about the stability of the building site.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Construction workers guide a jumping wall form system into place as it is lowered into position by a crane into the core of the Wilshire Grand tower.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Chris Martin, chairman and CEO of Martin Project Management, at the Wilshire Grand tower construction site in downtown Los Angeles. Martin's firm is overseeing the construction.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

A secretary bows her head as Yang Ho Cho, chairman of Korean Air, makes his way into his office at Korean Air's headquarters in Seoul, Korea.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Carpenters do warmup exercises to loosen their muscles before starting their shift on the Wilshire Grand tower.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Yang Ho Cho, chairman of Korean Air, at the airline's headquarters in Seoul in May. Korean Air is building a skyscraper in downtown Los Angeles with 900 hotel rooms and 400,000 square feet of office space.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Yang Ho Cho, with daughter Heather, has an interest in photography. They stand with a statue commemorating Korean Air's purchase of a 747-8 in November 2009.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Ironworker Joel Ruvalcaba tightens up rebar during construction of the 73-story, 1,100-foot tall Wilshire Grand tower in Downtown Los Angeles.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

David Martin of A.C. Martin Partners, the firm responsible for the design of the Wilshire Grand tower, shows a model of the 73-story skyscraper.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Yang Ho Cho, chairman of Wilshire Grand property owner Korean Air, and his daughter Heather Cho, executive vice president, at company headquarters in Seoul.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Architect Chris Martin, former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Yang Ho Cho, chairman of Korean Air, with a model of the Wilshire Grand Tower on July 24.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce

Apprentice Josh Magana, right, naps before the start of his shift on the Wilshire Grand tower.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Yang Ho Cho, chairman of Korean Air, and his daughter Heather Cho, executive vice president, inside a hangar at Korean Air's headquarters in Seoul.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

An overview of the New Wilshire Grand project construction site.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

The USC marching band leads a parade on Figueroa Street in downtown Los Angeles to kick off what became the world's largest continuous concrete pour.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Turner Construction Co. general superintendent Michael Marchesano, left, and Bill Depasquale, field operations superintendent, stand on the 18-foot-thick foundation of the New Wilshire Grand tower.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Remote-controlled booms are used to place concrete with accuracy as workers pour the foundation for the New Wilshire Grand tower.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

David De Loera wipes concrete from his face while helping to pour the foundation for the New Wlishire Grand tower.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Pipes are moved into position for the concrete pour at the New Wilshire Grand project.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

A temporary pipe is put into place to keep concrete from splattering as workers pour the foundation for the New Wilshire Grand tower in downtown Los Angeles.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Trucks dump their loads into pumps that send concrete through booms to the foundation.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

A concrete truck dumps its load into a pump at the New Wilshire Grand tower construction site.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES, CA-FEBRUARY 16, 2014: Concrete trucks dump their loads into concrete pumps using remote-controlled articulating robotic arms (called a boom) that are used to place concrete with pinpoint accuracy as workers pour the foundation for the 73 story, 1100 foot tall Wilshire Grand Center in Downtown Los Angeles that will be the tallest structure west of the Mississippi River, its developers say, when its 160 foot spire is included. The concrete pour required 2100 truck loads delivering 21,200 cubic yards of concrete, weighing 82 million pounds. (Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times)

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon

Workers gather on Figueroa Street before the record-setting concrete pour for the foundation of the 73-story, 1,100-foot-tall New Wilshire Grand tower, which will be the tallest structure west of the Mississippi River upon its completion.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

A temporary pipe is put into place to keep concrete from splattering as workers pour the foundation for the New Wilshire Grand tower.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Workers direct concrete from a boom into the foundation of the New Wilshire Grand tower.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, left, and Yang Ho Cho, Chairman of Korean Air and the developer of the New Wilshire Grand project, push the switch on a remote control held by construction worker Mike Casad to activate the first pump during the start of the concrete pour. To the right of Cho To Cho's is his daughter Heather and at far right is State Senator Kevin De Leon.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Journeyman Craig Hoback, left, and apprentice Geovanny Castro place a ground well into position during construction of the Wilshire Grand tower.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

Ironworker Joseph Voll tightens rebar during construction of the 1,100-foot-tall Wilshire Grand tower. It will be the tallest structure west of Chicago, its developers say.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

When finished, the New Wilshire Grand will rise 1,100 feet and be the tallest building west of the Mississippi. The logistics for the concrete pour are daunting; crews have been preparing the site for five months.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times

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Wilshire Grand Tower: A skyscrapper is born

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Wilshire Grand Tower: A skyscrapper is born

Over the next three years, workers will raise the New Wilshire Grand tower 1,100 feet above the corner of Figueroa Street and Wilshire Boulevard. With an open promenade and an enormous swoop of glass above the entrance, this translucent airplane wing 73 stories tall promises to redefine architectural possibilities in a city not known for its tall buildings.

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