Framework

Capturing the world through photography, video and multimedia

March 7, 1965: Alabama state troopers use clubs against participants of a civil rights voting march in Selma, Ala. At foreground right, John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, is beaten by a state trooper. The day, which became known as "Bloody Sunday," is widely credited for galvanizing the nation's leaders and ultimately yielded passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This photo was published on page one of the March 8, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

March 9, 1965: U.S. marshals drag sit-down demonstrators in the lobby of the Federal Building in Los Angeles. The protest was in support of marchers in Selma, Ala. This photo was published in the March 10, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Jack Gaunt / Los Angeles Times

March 10, 1965: A young woman is carried by a U.S. marshal and a man is dragged away by two others from a Federal Building parking lot as officers began arresting sit-in demonstrators. This photo was published in the March 11, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Art Rogers / Los Angeles Times

March 9, 1965: A deputy U.S. marshal, left, struggles with a civil rights demonstrator during a melee that erupted at the Federal Building in Los Angeles when protesters attempted to stage a sit-in there. This photo was published in the March 10, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bruce Cox / Los Angeles Times

March 10, 1965: Three U.S. marshals -- one in the photo's upper left, one wearing a checkered shirt at lower left, and one in a suit at upper right -- struggle with demonstrators blocking entry to L.A.'s Federal Building. This photo was published in the March 11, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ray Graham / Los Angeles Times

March 9, 1965: Sit-in protesters are removed from a hallway in the U.S. attorney's office in L.A.'s Federal Building. This photo was published in the March 10, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Bruce Cox / Los Angeles Times

March 10, 1965: A deputy U.S. marshal, right, speaks to demonstrators who are lying down across a parking entrance to L.A.'s Federal Building. This photo was published in the March 11, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Ray Graham / Los Angeles Times

March 10, 1965: U.S. deputy marshals forcibly remove a demonstrator from an entrance to a Federal Building parking lot in Los Angeles. This photo was published in the March 11, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Larry Sharkey / Los Angeles Times

March 11, 1965: Protest leaders demonstrate methods of self-protection in the event of violence. The instruction was part of a non-violence workshop held at the entrance to the Federal Building in downtown Los Angeles.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Archive/UCLA

March 10, 1965: A sit-in demonstrator is lifted by his arm and leg as he is removed from a Federal Building parking lot in Los Angeles. Arrests began after demonstrators blocked the path of a U.S. mail truck. This photo was published in the March 11, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Art Rogers / Los Angeles Times

March 10, 1965: As a bus loaded with arrested women prepares to leave the Federal Building in Los Angeles, male demonstrators try to block its departure. The man at left is dragged away from the bus. Marshals later removed the other man from under bus. This photo was published on the front page of the March 11, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Steve Fontanini / Los Angeles Times

March 11, 1965: Members of the Students Civil Rights Organization at Los Angeles Valley College conduct a "sympathy vigil" on campus in response to the beating of civil rights demonstrators in Alabama. This photo was published in the March 12, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Archive/UCLA

March 13, 1965: Civil rights marchers leave Pershing Square at 5th and Hill streets in Los Angeles en route to the Federal Building.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Archive/UCLA

March 17, 1965: Guards carry a demonstrator from L.A.'s Federal Building after he and 11 others staged a sit-in protest. Those sitting on the steps were also removed. This photo was published in the March 18, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Don Cormier / Los Angeles Times

March 18, 1965: About 250 people march from Pasadena City College to the main post office to show sympathy for civil rights demonstrators in Selma, Ala. This photo was published in the March 19, 1965 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

March 19, 1965: Demonstrators sing as they march on Los Angeles City Hall in the wake of the March 7, 1965, beating of marchers in Selma, Ala. This photo was published in the March 21, 1965, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: United Press International

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Los Angeles protests in support of Selma marchers

After the March 7, 1965, beating of civil rights marchers in Selma, Ala., by state troopers, protests broke out across the United States. In Los Angeles, demonstrators gathered to demand federal intervention to protect the marchers in Alabama. Over the next few days, more than 100 protesters were arrested.

Front page of the March 8, 1965 Los Angeles Times with the story and photo of beatings in Selma, Alabama. Several additional wire photos were published inside the paper. Credit: ProQuest.

On Saturday, March 13, 1965, more than 6,000 demonstrators marched from Pershing Square to City Hall and the Federal Building. Staff writer Harry Trimborn reported in the next morning’s Los Angeles Times:

Six thousand men, women and children paraded peacefully in downtown Los Angeles Saturday in a massive civil rights demonstration marred by a bomb threat and a switch in plans that angered federal officials.

The march was one of the largest–and most orderly–ever held in the city. The more than 100 police officers, most in plainclothes, assigned to oversee the parade did little more than mingle with the demonstrators.

The paraders seemed to represent a cross-section of the entire city. There were clergymen and nuns, housewives pushing baby strollers and swarthy young men in Beatle hairdos, men in business suits and men in jeans, attractive young girls and elderly women in flowered hats. …

The bomb threat came as a group of congressmen tried in vain to convince U.S. Atty. Manuel Real to meet as scheduled with civil rights leaders.

Real was informed that an anonymous telephone caller said a bomb had been placed in the Federal Building and would explode 15 minutes later. …

The entire building was then emptied and marshals and other federal personnel searched the massive building, but found nothing.

Before the discussion broke up. Real accused leaders of the demonstration of “bad faith” because they did not follow a pre-arranged parade route.

He said the fact that the marchers and their leaders were on federal property was a violation of a Thursday court order banning “all picketing, parading and demonstrating” on federal land.

The order was issued in the wake of flareups of violence during the week when civil rights demonstrators blocked entrances and driveways at the building.

Real said the original plans called for demonstrators to start at Pershing Square at 11 a.m. and march to the Federal Building. There, a delegation was to peel off for a discussion with Real, while the rest circled the building and halted in front of City Hall for a rally.

The paraders followed the first part of the plan, but stopped at the Federal Building instead of continuing to City Hall. …

Many of the demonstrators maintained that federal property was a fitting locale for the demonstration, since they were there to urge federal intervention in the racial turmoil in Selma, Ala. …

For more check out the Los Angeles Times coverage: 50 years after the march on Selma.

scott.harrison@latimes.com

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1 Comment

  1. March 8, 2015, 2:58 pm

    I was in Vietnam and Armed Forces Radio never reported this. We never got any information about the freedom Marcher’s until I returned from there.

    I was station In Hue and Dang 1964-1965

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