Framework

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Jan. 13, 1945: Los Angeles Mayor Fletcher Bowron, second from right, welcomes Japanese American internees back to Los Angeles. From left, back row: Jack Yoshimizu, Henry Yoshimizu, Mariko Hoshiyama, Bowron and Harley Oko. Seated from left: Melba Matsuura and Mary Yoshimizu. This photo was published in the Jan. 15, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Frank Q. Brown / Los Angeles Times

Jan. 5, 1945: Ko Yamaguchi, 10, holds feed for a chicken held by Stephen Emerson, 11. Yamaguchi was given special permission to live in Pasadena with the family of Dr. Robert Emerson after his father died of cancer at the Manzanar War Relocation Center. This photo was published in the Jan. 6, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

Feb. 28, 1945: Returning Japanese American internees, center, are welcomed at Evergreen Hostel, a former boarding school in East Los Angeles. From left are the Rev. Sohei Kowta, Yoshiko Yasuda, Hiromu Nakamura and Esther B. Rhoads. Kowta, pastor of former Japanese Presbyterian Church, operates the hostel. Rhoads is with the American Friends Service Committee. Yasuda was from the Poston, Ariz., relocation center, and Nakamura, 18, was a college student in North Dakota.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Archive/UCLA

April 19, 1945: A busload of Japanese American internees from Manzanar pass through Los Angeles en route to new homes in Utah. Many were residents of Los Angeles. This photo was published in the April 20, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Al Humphreys / Los Angeles Times

July 31, 1945: Japanese Americans, part of a group of 94, return to Los Angeles' Union Station after spending three years in the War Relocation Center in Arkansas. This photo was published in the Aug. 1, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

July 31, 1945: Joichi Shimazu, left, daughter Jean, 16, center, and wife Shizuka are among a group of 96 Japanese Americans arriving at Union Station from the War Relocation Authority center in Rohwer, Ark. The Shimazus had three sons in the Army. This photo was published in the Aug. 1, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

July 31, 1945: More of the internees at Union Station. The 2,000-mile trip took seven days in day coaches. This photo was published in the Aug. 1, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

Aug. 9, 1945: Some of the 36 Japanese Americans removed from the Southland three years earlier to a relocation camp at Heart Mountain, near Cody, Wyo., return to Union Station. This photo was published in the Aug. 10, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

Aug. 9, 1945: At Union Station, Theresa Moro greets Takachi Fujii, 7. His mother, Teruko Fujii, is the background. The Fujiis were among a group of 36 Japanese Americans returning here from relocation camp at Heart Mountain. Before the war, the father, Fred Fuji, was employed by Moro's husband, Pete. A similar photo was published in the Aug. 10, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Archive/UCLA

Aug. 9, 1945: Moro and the Fujiis. This was published in the Aug. 10, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

Aug. 22, 1945: Japanese American internees returning from a relocation camp in Wyoming walk past a group of combat veterans who were waiting at Union Station to board train for San Luis Obispo and possible redeployment to Japan as occupation troops. This photo was published in the Aug. 24, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

Nov. 5, 1945: Masashi Sakatani watches his children unpack belongings at former Army barracks in Burbank where they are housed after returning from Hart Mountain, Wyo. The children are, from left, Katsutaoshi, 4; Masako, 10; Kiyomi, 1; and Sachiko, 12. This photo was published in the Nov. 6, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times Archive/UCLA

Nov. 14, 1945: Equipment and supplies are readied for use by returning Japanese American internees at former Army barracks in El Segundo. Twenty-four one-room apartments were being prepared. This photo was published in the Nov. 15, 1945, Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: R.O. Ritchie / Los Angeles Times

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In January 1945, the exclusion mandate under Executive Order 9066 was rescinded and Japanese American internees were allowed to return to the West Coast.

After a slow start, by the summer of 1945, thousands of internees were coming back to Southern California.

An article in the Aug. 1, 1945, Los Angeles Times reported:

Back from three years in a War Relocation Authority center in Rohwer, Ark., 96 Japanese-Americans yesterday arrived in Los Angeles to resume an existence interrupted by the exigencies of a war that made the Pacific Coast a potential combat area.

As they stepped off their special train in Union Station Joichi Shimazu, father of three enlisted men in the United States Army, voiced the feelings of the whole contingent:

Ii kimochi de ne!!!”

“My, it feels good to be back!” he translated.

Shimazu, a former Long Beach farmer, was accompanied by his wife, Mrs. Shizuka Shimazu, who proudly wore a three-starred service pin, and their daughter Jean, 16.

Mrs. Shimazu said that just before leaving the Arkansas center they had been visited by one of their sons, Pvt. Roy Shimazu, who was badly wounded in Italy, losing his right eye. He is a patient at the Army’s General Hospital in Beaumont, Tex. Pfc. Thomas Shimazu, 21, still is in Italy, while Pvt. Ben, 18, is in training at Camp Livingston, Louisiana. The family will settle on a farm near Talbert in Orange County, they said. …

By coincidence, as the Japanese filed into the station patio to await the transfer of their baggage, another train disgorged 400 battle-tested veterans of the Second Marine Division.

The Leathernecks, obviously surprised at the sight of [Japanese] in Los Angeles, gazed at them stonily and without comment. The marines marched away, under command of 1st Lt. Arthur F. Boehme, while the station loudspeaker system poured forth the strains of “From the Halls of Montezuma.”

The above photo gallery includes images from Los Angeles Times coverage of returning Japanese Americans from January through November 1945.

This gallery accompanies these previous From the Archive posts:

Alien Registration Act of 1940 [updated]

1941 camera and radio confiscation

Executive Order 9066: Japanese American internment in World War II

Japanese evicted from Terminal Island

Japanese Internment: Santa Anita Assembly Center

Japanese American internment: Pomona Assembly Center

Japanese Internment: Manzanar

Japanese Internment: Poston

This series of posts on the internment of Japanese Americans began in 2012.

scott.harrison@latimes.com

Follow Scott Harrison on Twitter and Google+

Thumbnail view of all From the Archive posts.

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