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Nov. 28, 1934: About 75 workers on strike against Los Angeles Railway rocked a streetcar off its tracks at 23rd and Main streets shortly before 6 p.m. About 20 passengers and crew were forced to disembark before the car was overturned. This photo was published in the Nov. 29, 1934 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Duke Ledford / Los Angeles Times

Nov. 25, 1934: A Los Angeles Railway streetcar sits at Florence and Vermont avenues where 15 people were injured. Strikers attacked nonstriking crews, causing two cars to stall. A third car skidded into the other two and the crash injured several passengers. This photo was published in the Nov. 26, 1934 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Associated Press

Nov. 27, 1934: Los Angeles Railway President S. M. Haskins reads documents during a conference. The company refused to accept union demands that strikers be reinstated as a means of a truce. Haskins said this would be unfair to loyal workers. This photo was published in the Nov. 28, 1934 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: William E. Snyder / Los Angeles Times

Nov. 26, 1934: A crowd during the transit strike at 7th and Broadway. A large unruly crowd gathered in downtown Los Angeles, leading to police firing tear gas. This photo was published in the Nov. 27, 1934 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Richard H. Bell / Los Angeles Times

Nov. 26, 1934: Det. Lt. Jack Stambler fires tear gas at strikers at 7th and Broadway. This photo was published in the Nov. 27, 1934 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: William E. Snyder / Los Angeles Times

Nov. 27, 1934: A Los Angeles Railway streetcar was overturned in the intersection of Pico Boulevard and Vermont Avenue. This photo was published in the Nov. 28, 1934 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Fred Coffey / Los Angeles Times

Nov. 28, 1934, A streetcar with many students aboard is guarded by Los Angeles motorcycle officers during a violence-plagued strike against Los Angeles Railway. This photo was published in the Nov. 29, 1934 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

Nov. 28, 1934: Broken wheel carriers kept this inbound streetcar from crashing on its side at 7th and Broadway. Strikers against Los Angeles Railway forced motorman D. E. Moore and a capacity load of passengers to get off the streetcar. This photo was published in the Nov. 29, 1934 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Wide World Photo

Dec. 5, 1934: A crowd of more than 500 strikers and their sympathizers march on the Spring Street side of Los Angeles City Hall. A committee of four from the march tried to meet with Mayor Frank Shaw, who was not in his office. This photo was published in the Dec. 6, 1934 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times / Los Angeles Times

Dec. 18, 1934: An automobile axle laid across the tracks derailed a Los Angeles Railway streetcar at 37th Street and McClintock Avenue. The derailed car crashed into a trolley post on the east side of McClintock. Seven of 50 passengers were treated for shock. The derailment was the first violence in several days during a transit strike. This photo was published in the Dec. 19, 1934 Los Angeles Times.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Los Angeles Times

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1934 transit strike turns violent

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1934 transit strike turns violent

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A 1934 strike by the Amalgamated Assn. of Street and Electric Railway Employees against the Los Angeles Railway Corp. turned violent with people injured and streetcars damaged.

A story in the Nov. 25, 1934 Los Angeles Times reported that the initial walkout caused few problems:

Over its entire network of rails and routes throughout the city, the yellow street cars and buses of the Los Angeles Railway Corporation ran yesterday and will continue to run today, officials said last night, with only a negligible variation in the regular schedules. …

The strike quickly turned violent with a series of attacks on streetcars. A caption in the Nov. 26, 1934 Los Angeles Times reported:

Fifteen persons were injured yesterday when striking street-car men and sympathizers attacked crews of two cars at Florence and Vermont avenues, beating the trainmen and stalling their cars. A third car skidded into the other two and the crash injured many passengers. …

A story in the Nov. 26, 1934 Los Angeles Times listed more than 50 reports of fights, stones thrown, shots fired and other strike-related violence. Another story listed 22 people injured in the violence.

A follow-up article in the Jan. 8, 1935 Los Angeles Times reported that the strike by the Amalgamated Assn. of Street and Electric Railway Employees failed with 485 strikers losing their jobs. In addition, about 125 people were arrested on charges related to the strike.

Today the Amalgamated Transit Union represents 190,000 workers in the United States and Canada — including many in Southern California.

scott.harrison@latimes.com

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